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I am trying some examples for DateDiff Function

SELECT DATEDIFF(day,'2008-06-05','2008-08-05') AS DiffDate 

This statement gives me an error From keyword not found where expected. Why do I get this error and how can I solve it? Also, when I try this :

SELECT DATEDIFF(day,datebegin,datestop) 
From table; 

I get this error "datediff" invalid identifier. How can I get day difference?

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What database are you using?

A google search gave me this:

http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/2508/sql-server-datediff-example/

DAY SELECT DATEDIFF(DD,'09/23/2011 15:00:00','08/02/2011 14:00:00')

where 'DD' is used as opposed to 'days'.

Try answering these question:

What database I'm using?

Is the database case sensitive? This might be the error occurring with the datediff as oppose to DATEDIFF

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Yup, "What database I'm using?" this helped me. THANKS! I was using wrong syntax. –  lilu Nov 6 '12 at 23:12
    
@lilu i know its a small thing, but I too asked something very similar..maybe u didnt see mine? –  Sajjan Sarkar Nov 7 '12 at 0:45
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try SELECT DATEDIFF(dd,datebegin,datestop) from table

I think 'day' also works, I was able to execute:

SELECT DATEDIFF(day,'1/1/2011','1/1/2012') 

So Im not sure what you're doing wrong.. What version of SQL Server are you using?

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Congrats...then OP is getting datediff invalid identifier error!!! –  Rahul Tripathi Nov 6 '12 at 19:32
    
I already tried this and it gives me the same error : invalid indentifier –  lilu Nov 6 '12 at 19:33
    
@lilu can you execute this: SELECT DATEDIFF(day,'1/1/2011','1/1/2012') This worked for me.. I get 365 –  Sajjan Sarkar Nov 6 '12 at 19:34
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