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this may be a very basic c++ question but I am a bit rusty. I am trying to set up a maze type data structure with points. Here is my code.

class Point{

    public :

    int xCoord;
    int yCoord;
    bool visited;

    //constructors
    Point(){}
    Point(int x, int y){
        xCoord = x;
        yCoord = y;
        visited = false;
    }
    int makeVisited(){
        visited = true;
    }

    int makeUnvisited(){
        visited = false;
    }
};



class Maze{

    public :

    int width;
    int height;
    Point ** grid; 

    //constructors
    Maze(){}
    Maze(int X, int Y){
        width = X;
        height = Y;
        grid = new Point*[width];
        for(int i = 0; i < width; i++){
            grid[i] = new Point[height];
            for(int j = 0; j < height; j++){
                grid[i][j] = new Point(i, j);
            }
        }
    }
}; //end of Maze class

When I try to asign grid[i][j] a new point instance, I get an error saying

"error no operator "=" matches these operands"

Can someone tell me what I did wrong with the initialization of the point object?

share|improve this question
2  
Stop using pointers for this and consider using std::vector<std::vector<Point> >. – andre Nov 6 '12 at 19:49
2  
Isn't makeVisited() and makeUnvisited() supposed to return an int? Otherwise change them to void. – bobestm Nov 6 '12 at 19:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since grid is declared as a Point**, then grid[i][j] is of type Point. So you can't assign a new Point to this.


One thing you can do is to define a setter member function, like:

void Point::set(int x, int y) {
  xCoord = x;
  yCoord = y;
}

And then in your loop you can use:

grid[i][j].set(i, j);
share|improve this answer
    
A setter method like this is silly. Just use plain old assignment. That's what it's for. Compounding Java thinking with yet more Java thinking... – Omnifarious Nov 6 '12 at 19:55
    
Now that fixed things, I think I will go with that. However, one last thing, I now have an error of "incomplete types are not allowed" – Zack Nov 6 '12 at 20:01
    
when I try and declare a maze like Maze main_maze **edit, nvmd fixed it. Thanks Guys! – Zack Nov 6 '12 at 20:01
    
@Omnifarious I'm not sure why you accuse me of Java thinking. Did you look at my profile? – chrisaycock Nov 6 '12 at 20:03
1  
@chrisaycock: Ahh, no. So apparently that's not where your predilection for 'setter' methods comes from. :-) I tend to really dislike those tiny little methods most of the time because they're an indication of poor design. And in this case I think they obscure the fact that you're basically doing simple assignment. – Omnifarious Nov 6 '12 at 20:06

Your for loop should look like this:

for(int i = 0; i < width; i++){
    grid[i] = new Point[height];
    for(int j = 0; j < height; j++){
        grid[i][j] = Point(i, j);
    }
}

Your array contains all its points by value, it doesn't contain pointers to them. I think that's the right design choice on your part. But that means that you don't try to put pointers in there. The type of grid[i][j] is Point, not Point *. The new operator will allocate space for a Point object on the heap and return a Point * pointing to it. But you already have a perfectly fine Point object in your array already.

Your code looks like you're used to Java. In C++ you can actually contain values directly instead of always having references to them. All of your points are actually initialized using their default constructors in the line that reads grid[i] = new Point[height];. There you create height Point objects and each of their default constructors is called to initialize them.

If you use my code, you then later re-assign their values from a temporary Point object. This object's creation will be optimized out of existence by the compiler and it will simply turn into assigning the new xCoord and yCoord values of the already existing Point directly from i and j.

share|improve this answer
    
how would i fix my code then? That is initially what i wanted to do. – Zack Nov 6 '12 at 19:57
    
@Zack: Your code will be just fine if you use the version of the for loop I suggest. Creating all of these tiny Point objects on the heap with new will result in a lot of efficiency problems and no locality of reference. – Omnifarious Nov 6 '12 at 20:00

Hmm, you need Point ***grid, coz you obviously want to have 2 dim array storing pointers.

share|improve this answer

The compiler is pointing out that you do not have an assignment operator for the class. You will have to define an 'operator=' method to achieve what you are trying to do. You are also better to use vectors in this instance.

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