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Given a hash such as:

AppConfig = {
  'service' => {
    'key' => 'abcdefg',
    'secret' => 'secret_abcdefg'
  },
  'other' => {
    'service' => {
      'key' => 'cred_abcdefg',
      'secret' => 'cred_secret_abcdefg'
    }
  }
}

I need a function to return service/key in some cases and other/service/key in other cases. A straightforward way is to pass in the hash and an array of keys, like so:

def val_for(hash, array_of_key_names)
  h = hash
  array_of_key_names.each { |k| h = h[k] }
  h
end

So that this call results in 'cred_secret_abcdefg':

val_for(AppConfig, %w[other service secret])

It seems like there should be a better way than what I've written in val_for().

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what should happen if a intermediate key is not found? and if the last key is not there? –  tokland Nov 6 '12 at 21:01
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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
def val_for(hash, keys)
  keys.inject(hash) { |h, key| h[key] }
end

This will raise an exception if some intermediate key is not found. Note also that this is completely equivalent to keys.inject(hash, :[]), but this may very well confuse some readers.

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Sure, it's up to the caller in my implementation to know what the config keys are. Thanks! –  JD. Nov 6 '12 at 21:02
    
Yea, yours is really better :). –  Andrés Nov 6 '12 at 21:07
    
note that we could also write keys.inject(hash, :[]) mimicking sawa's simplification. –  tokland Nov 7 '12 at 16:16
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%w[other service secret].inject(AppConfig, &:fetch)
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oh, indeed, and you can even write :fetch. This will fail also if the last key is not found, but that seems ok for the OP. –  tokland Nov 7 '12 at 8:17
    
Your comment makes my answer look like it was written after you added the symbol to proc solution to your answer. –  sawa Nov 7 '12 at 13:07
    
I am puzzled, I +1'd your answer and commented it with "oh, indeed" precisely to show that I had forgotten about this inject simplification and I wanted to give credit before editing my answer! Apparently I failed in my intention :-( –  tokland Nov 7 '12 at 16:13
    
At first, I did not understand what you meant by "even" in the comment. It implies it is compared to something. Then I realized that your comment makes sense only after reading the edited part of your answer. This looked like assuming the reader will look at your answer, then read mine as a variant of it. But now I understand your intention. –  sawa Nov 7 '12 at 16:35
1  
Ok. With the "even" I meant you can simplify it a bit more and drop the &, inject accepts a symbol so the Symbol#to_proc trick is not necessary. –  tokland Nov 7 '12 at 16:43
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appConfig = {
  'service' => {
    'key' => 'abcdefg',
    'secret' => 'secret_abcdefg'
  },
  'other' => {
    'service' => {
      'key' => 'cred_abcdefg',
      'secret' => 'cred_secret_abcdefg'
    }
  }
}

def val_for(hash, array_of_key_names)
  eval "hash#{array_of_key_names.map {|key| "[\"#{key}\"]"}.join}"
end

val_for(appConfig, %w[other service secret]) # => "cred_secret_abcdefg"
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Thanks Andres, but eval'ing a string and using escape characters isn't much prettier than what I originally wrote. :\ –  JD. Nov 6 '12 at 21:06
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You could use the Nested Value or Vine gem.

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