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I needed to turn character Date "2008-1-1" to numeric 20080101, but what I get is 200811, could anybody help me with this? Thank you very much. This is my code:

year <- c(2008:2012)
mth <- c(1:5)  
day <- c(1:5) 
A <- data.frame(cbind(year,mth,day)) 
date.ch <- as.character(with(A, paste(year, mth, day, sep="-")))
date.n <- as.numeric(with(A, paste(year, mth, day, sep="")))
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You may have to use sprintf to do this. –  Andrie Nov 6 '12 at 21:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use as.numeric(format(as.Date(date.ch), '%Y%m%d'))

[1] 20080101 20090202 20100303 20110404 20120505
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thanks a lot!!!!!! –  Rosa Nov 7 '12 at 16:35

How about simple multiplication and addition?

A <- data.frame(cbind(year=rep(2008:2011,6),mth=rep(1:12,2),day=1:24))
with(A, year*1e4 + mth*1e2 + day)
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Interesting, thanks –  Rosa Nov 7 '12 at 16:32

As @Andrie mentioned, sprintf is a nice function:

with(A, as.numeric(sprintf("%i%02i%02i", year, mth, day)))
# [1] 20080101 20090202 20100303 20110404 20120505

As @mplourde noted in a comment that has since disappeared into the ether, if you only have the date.ch object, you could

as.numeric(strftime(date.ch, format = "%Y%m%d"))
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@mplourde, ah, yes. I knew there were two reasons I up-voted your answer. –  BenBarnes Nov 6 '12 at 21:25
    
still might be helpful for her to see how sprintf works... –  Matthew Plourde Nov 6 '12 at 21:27
    
@BenBarnes:Thank you! –  Rosa Nov 7 '12 at 16:34

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