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I want to be able to check the existence of up to, but often less than, 6 consecutively named variables using a FOR loop thus:

for ($i = 0; $i <= 5; $i++) {
   $vartocheck = "$var_".$i;
   if ($vartocheck) {
      echo $vartocheck." exists!";
   }
}

Now I know the above doesn't work but I can't figure out how to reference and check the existence of $var_0 through to $var_5 by using the value of $i.

I have tried isset and call_user_func to construct and return the variable name I am after but I have had no success thus far.

I am trying to avoid an eval statement.

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2  
It really sounds like your vars should be in an array instead of just independently named variables. –  Paolo Bergantino Nov 6 '12 at 21:19
    
You can always use eval (which is in no way evil) :-) ... –  adeneo Nov 6 '12 at 21:23
    
Hmm, possibly. At the moment I am working with the system as it is and I know that the variable have been declared so I am trying to work with that first. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 21:25
    
if (isset(${"var_{$i}"})) looks to be the most direct way. –  Alain Tiemblo Nov 6 '12 at 21:26
    
@adeneo no. just no. Never use eval unless you have an overpoweringly strong reason and you have completely exhausted all other sane alternatives. –  Sammitch Nov 6 '12 at 21:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The most direct way looks to be :

for ($i = 0; $i <= 5; $i++) {
  if (isset(${"var_{$i}"})) {
    echo ${"var_{$i}"}." exists!";
  }
}

Note that :

$hello = 'world';
$world = 'foo';

$$hello === ${$hello} === ${"world"} === $world === 'foo'.

So in your original code, you can use :

for ($i = 0; $i <= 5; $i++) {
   $vartocheck = "var_".$i;
   if (isset($$vartocheck)) {
      echo '$'.$vartocheck." exists!";
   }
}
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Until I can sort the array-based solution, this is exactly what I needed. Many thanks. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 22:21

Don't do it (because it's just wrong to dynamically check the existence of variables by name), but it can be done using for example:

isset($$vartocheck);

Responding to your comment, this works:

<?php
    $var = 'abc';
    var_dump(isset($$var)); // bool(false)
    $abc = 1;
    var_dump(isset($$var)); // bool(true)

Check if you don't have special characters inside your $vartocheck (whitespaces etc.) or if the variable is really a string.

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Krzysztof - not sure what you mean by "Don't do it because it's just wrong". Also, I have tried using isset within the if statement but to no avail. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 21:24
    
Note the double $ signs. It reads the value of $vartocheck and tries the value as a name for the variable. It's wrong to do this because it can lead to a collision with existing variables. Say you have another variable in the scope which you don't want to check, it will return true for that variable too. If the data comes from user it might be a security issue. –  Krzysztof Hasiński Nov 6 '12 at 21:26
    
Put all of those variables in an array and check them using array_key_exists or isset. You can also iterate over them much easier. –  Krzysztof Hasiński Nov 6 '12 at 21:29
    
Ah, right. I did try that ($$) but had no success. The array-based solution is now on my "To Do" list but at least I have a working solution from ninsuo. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 22:24

You can try

$var_4 = "Test";
for($i = 0; $i <= 5; $i ++) {
    $vartocheck = "var_" . $i;
    if (isset(${$vartocheck})) {
        echo $vartocheck, " exists!";
    }
}

Output

var_4 exists!
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Thanks Baba. The solution below from Ninsuo is even more compact so I'll go with that for now. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 22:22

You can use $$var_name

modified version of your code:

for ($i = 0; $i <= 5; $i++) {
   $vartocheck = "var_".$i;
   if (isset($$vartocheck)) {
      echo $vartocheck." exists!";
   }
}

ps: +1 for using arrays.

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Hey there, I did try that but had no success. As for the Array, I shall add that to my "To Do" list once I have this all working as I need for proof of concept. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 22:20

Don't do it. It's poor practice to dynamically check the existence of variables by name, but if you must it can be done by the following:

isset($$vartocheck);

However, as @paolo-bergantino noted in the comments, you're much better off using an array for things like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey there, I did try that but had no success. –  MarbleCake Nov 6 '12 at 22:19

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