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I want to be able to create a new instance of an object by calling a method on an already instantiated object. For example, I have the object:

organism = Organism()

I want to be able to call organism.reproduce() and have two objects of type Organism. My method at this point looks like this:

class Organism(object):
    def reproduce():
        organism = Organism()

and I'm pretty sure it doesn't work (I'm not really even sure how to test it. I tried the gc method in this post). So how can I make my object create a copy of itself that's accessible just like the first object I created (with organism = Organism())?

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I suppose that when you say reproduce, you really mean clone, right? And if that's the case then it would help tremendously to tell us what are the defining characteristics/attributes of your Organism, in order to do it right. –  rantanplan Nov 6 '12 at 23:05
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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
class Organism(object):
    def reproduce(self):
        #use self here to customize the new organism ...
        return Organism()

Another option -- if the instance doesn't matter:

class Organism(object):
    @classmethod
    def reproduce(cls):
        return cls()

This makes sure that Organisms produce more Organisms and (hypothetical Borgs which are derived from Organisms produce more Borgs)


Finally, if both the instance and the class matter:

class Organism(object):
    def reproduce(self):
        #use self here to customize the new organism ...
        return self.__class__()

In each case, you'd use it as:

organism = Organism()
new_organism = organism.reproduce()
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You cannot use self in the second example. –  Niklas R Nov 6 '12 at 22:43
    
@NiklasR -- Thanks. That was an artifact of copying the first example to make the second. I removed that comment. –  mgilson Nov 6 '12 at 22:44
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The same way you did originally, but then you have to do something with it!

organism = Organism() calls the class Organism (parentheses directly after a name is the "call" operation). This creates and returns a new instance of the class, which you then bind to the name organism.

When you execute that line in the interpreter, you now have a variable organism referring to the new Organism instance you just created.

When you write that line inside a function (including a method, because there's no difference between a method and a function "from the inside"), it does the same thing, but the variable organism is a local variable. Local variables are thrown away when the function is finished, so this does create a new Organism instance, but it doesn't achieve anything because you never gain access to it.

Your function should return any information it wants to communicate to its caller. Any local variables that you don't return are only useful if you use those variables to create something you do return.

Note that this has nothing to do with your particular problem of creating an instance inside a method; it's just how functions/methods work in general. You will need to learn how functions work before you can successfully write object-oriented programs using classes and instances; I would strongly suggest you work through some tutorials.

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why not simply use the copy module?

import copy
organism = Organism()
replica = copy.deepcopy(organism)
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from copy import copy                                                           

class Organism(object):                                                         

    def __init__(self,name):                                                    
        self.name=name                                                          

    def setName(self,name):                                                     
        self.name=name                                                          

    def reproduce(self,childname):     
        #use deepcopy if necessary                                         
        cp = copy(self)                                                         
        cp.setName("descendant from " + self.name + " " + childname)            
        return cp                                                               

    def __str__(self):                                                          
        return self.name                                                        

first = Organism("first")                                                       
second = first.reproduce("second")                                              

print first                                                                     
print second 
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What about something like this:

class Organism(object):

    population = []

    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        self.population.append(self)
    def have_one_child(self, name):
        return Organism(name)
    def reproduce(self, names):
        return [self.have_one_child(name) for name in names]

Result:

>>> a = Organism('a')
>>> len(Organism.population)
1
>>> a.reproduce(['x', 'y', 'z']) # when one organism reproduces, children are added
                                 # to the total population
                                 # organism produces as many children as you state
[<__main__.Organism object at 0x05F23190>, <__main__.Organism object at 0x05F230F0>, <__main__.Organism object at 0x05F23230>]
>>> for ele in Organism.population:
...     print ele.name
... 
a
x
y
z
>>> Organism.population[3].reproduce(['f', 'g'])
[<__main__.Organism object at 0x05F231D0>, <__main__.Organism object at 0x05F23290>]
>>> for ele in Organism.population:
...     print ele.name
... 
a
x
y
z
f
g
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