Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning lots of javascript these days, and one of the things I'm not quite understanding is passing functions as parameters to other functions. I get the concept of doing such things, but I myself can't come up with any situations where this would be ideal.

My question is:

When do you want to have your javascript functions take another function as a parameter? Why not just assign a variable to that function's return value and pass that variable to the function like so:

// Why not do this
var foo = doStuff(params);
callerFunction(foo);

//instead of this
callerFunction(doStuff);

I'm confused as to why I would ever choose to do things as in my second example.

Why would you do this? What are some use cases?

share|improve this question
1  
There's just such a long list of answers that I fear mine isn't going to stand out, but you want some use cases? This is the most obvious one I know of: jQuery(document).read() is a function, to which you pass a function that is called when the document is read: $(document).ready(function()<---, same goes for nearly all jQ functions, they all expect a callback function to be passed as an argument, as do many native JS functions, too (array,sort();) here's some code of yours that does just that –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 6 '12 at 23:08
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's yet another example. Does some formatting operations on an array:

function pctFormatter(num) {
  return num + '%';
}

function centsFormatter(num) {
  return num + '.00';
}

function formatThisArray(array, formatter) {
  var output = [];
  for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
    output.push( formatter(array[i]) );
  }
  return output;
}

formatThisArray([1,2,3], pctFormatter);// returns ['1%', '2%', '3%']
formatThisArray([1,2,3], centsFormatter);// returns ['1.00', '2.00', '3.00']
share|improve this answer
    
nice one thank you i addapted your code to how i needed it and it works for me :) –  Epik Nov 6 '12 at 23:54
    
Why? what's the matter with (array.join('%,') + '%').split(','); or (array.join('.00,') + '.00').split(',');? Honestly creating 3 functions and manually iterating an array for something you can do with a simple one-liner? 3 up-votes and accepted, sometimes, I don't get the voting system here –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 7 '12 at 0:25
    
Srsly? It's a ("yet another") example of "passing a JavaScript function as a parameter," as the asker wrote. It's a simplistic use of a general pattern – Functional Programming. If you don't think it should be the accepted answer, that's fair enough (though not your/my decision). And if you think the answer should be (array.join('%,') + '%').split(','); you can add that as an answer to this post. –  meetamit Nov 7 '12 at 5:04
add comment

Handlers/listeners are a good example.

More generally, you can pass a function f as a parameter to function g when you don't know yet if g will need to call f, how many times it will need to call it, and/or with which parameters.

Examples:

  • sort algorithms: comparison function
  • regular expressions: replace function
  • callbacks (e.g. event handlers)
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for a common usage which isn't AJAX! –  Eric Nov 6 '12 at 23:21
    
@Eric: it's very common to have a getXHR function, that creates an instance of an xhr object, and sets the onreadychange handler IMO, in which case, that handler can, and often is, a function passed to the function as an argument –  Elias Van Ootegem Nov 6 '12 at 23:43
add comment

You'd do it when you don't have the params to pass, but the callerFunction() does.

A callback to an AJAX request is one use case.

function myCallback(response) {
    // do something with the response
}

myAJAX('http://example.com/foo.json', myCallback)

This lets myAJAX to the work of making the request, and waiting for the response. Then it invokes myCallback and passes it the response when that response finally arrives.

share|improve this answer
add comment
// Why not do this
var foo = doStuff(params);
callerFunction(foo);

//instead of this
callerFunction(doStuff);

First example will run the function doStuff with params and the assign the result to foo. callerFunction will be called with parameter foo (which is now a result of dooStuff);

Second example will call callerFunction and pass doStuff as a parameter. The callerFunction might or might not call the doStuff.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Well, sometimes you don't know who the caller of a function will be until it's called - this precludes passing pre-calculated values.

A couple of examples that spring to mind are:

(a) setTimeout or setInterval - you want to call a specific function after a specified period, either one-shot, or repeatedly. If the function called returned a value that had a dependance on time, there are instances where you couldn't possibly pre-calculate the value - it needs to be done at the scheduled time. So, we tell the functions which of our own functions to call at the specified time.

(b) when loading (or at least attepmpting to) various resources. We can give the element a function that is to be executed when loading is successful, and another when it fails. You don't actually know when the effort to load a resource has finished until either of these two (user-supplied) functions are called. In the case of many resources, this is where you increment the counters that maintain the number of successful/failed load attempts.

(c) the NodeList returned by calls to getElementsByClass or getElementsByTagName. It's not an actual (javascript native) Array object. As such, you can't call the forEach method on it, like you can with an array. To get around this, I use the following helper function:

// getElementsByTagName, getElementsByClass - both return a NodeList
// it is accessed in the same way as an array - with the [] operators, but it's
// not an array object - this is a function that allows us to still iterate through it
// in much the same way.
function forEachNode(nodeList, func)
{
    var i, n = nodeList.length;
    for (i=0; i<n; i++)
    {
        func(nodeList[i], i, nodeList);
    }
}

This allows me to get a list of nodes and then call some user-defined function on each of them. In use, it looks like this:

var allAnchors = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
forEachNode(allAnchors, showNodeTextVal);
function showNodeTextVal(curElem, curIndex, origList)
{
  alert(curElem.innerText);
}

Or more simply:

var allAnchors = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
forEachNode(allAnchors, function(curElem){alert(curElem.innerText);} );

This is a much clearer, less error-prone situation than it would be if we didn't use this helper function. To achieve the same functionality, we'd need to code the following:

var nodeList = document.getElementsByTagName('a');
var i, n = nodeList.length;
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
  alert(nodeList[i].innerText);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Most common case is handlers in JQuery:

function clickHandler(e){
  // handle click on e.Target
}

$("#button").click(clickHandler);

$(function(){
// do ready state initialization
});
share|improve this answer
add comment
callerFunction(doStuff);

with this code you give a "pointer" of the function doStuff to the function callerFunction

you can use it like this:

function callerFunction(doStuff) {

   var x = doStuff(...);
   ...;
}

you can so use the function in the function and not only the return value of doStuff.

greetings!

share|improve this answer
add comment

When do you want to have your javascript functions take another function as a parameter?

It's useful for callbacks for example:

function add( a, b, callback ) {
  callback( a, b );
  return a + b;
}

function added( a, b ) {
  alert('You just added two numbers: '+ a +' and '+ b);
}

alert( add( 1, 2, added ); // Will alert the message and then the result.

This a very simple example but it's very useful with asynchronous functions so you can run code after it has finished without interrupting the script.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to pass functions themselves, not return values, when you want to have your code really deal with functions as functions - code to execute. Consider this pseudo-code example:

function saveToLocalStorage(data) {...//saves to local storage}

function saveToServer(data) {...//saves via AJAX to server}

function saveToAmazonS3(data) {.../saves to Amazon S3 }

function multiSave(data, saverFunctions) {
    saverFunctions.forEach(function (saverFunction) {
      saverFunction(data);
    });
}

multiSave({user: "tim"}, [saveToLocalStorage, saveToServer, saveToAmazonS3]);

In this case, I want the actual functions themselves to be passed around and for other code to later invoke them. When we do this, a function such as multiSave is called a higher-order function because it deals with other functions directly. Because of the way multiSave works, I can easily put some checkboxes in the UI next to local/server/S3 and allow the user to choose where their data goes in a way that would be less elegant if I was unable to pass functions around as arguments.

share|improve this answer
add comment

When you're passing a function as an argument, that argument is not the return value of that function, but it's the function itself, you can call it as much as you like, with any argument you like, or you can assign it to an event.
You say you want some practical use cases, here's a short list of very common situations, all requiring a function to be passed as an argument.

Let's take a look at your average jQuery code, and count the number of times where a function is passed as an argument:

$(document).ready(function()//<-- 1
{
    $('#foo').on('click',function()//2
    {
    });
    $.each(something,function()//3
    {});
    //and so on
});

If you don't use jQuery, then try event delegation

document.body.addEventListener('click',function(e)
{
    e = e || window.event
    console.log('This function was passed as an argument to the addEventListener method');
},false);

Or even the simple Array.prototype.sort function (/method):

anArray.sort(function(a,b)
{
    return (a > b ? 1 : -1);
});

Or in cases where you need to make an ajax call, instead of creating a new XMLHttpRequest object on the spot, you might want a single function that sets the xhr object up, and pass the url, data and onreadystatechange callback as arguments:

function makeXHR(url,data,callback)
{
     try
     {
          var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
      }
      catch(e)
      {
           //etc...
      }
      xhr.onreadystatechange = callback;
}
makeXHR('some/url','foo=bar',function()
{
    if (this.readyState === 4 && this.status === 200)
    {
        //do stuff
    }
});

In all of these examples, I've created the functions in-line, of course referencing a function (by just passing its name) works just fine, too:

makeXHR('some/url','foo=bar',defaultXhrCallback);

These are just a few of thousands of use cases where you can/have to pass a function as an argument to another function

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.