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I have trouble thinking outside the box with the following issue. I have a class hierarchy:

[BaseClass] --> [Win32Class]

[BaseClass] --> [LinuxClass]

[BaseClass] --> [VxWorksClass]

The implementation classes will make calls to API-level functions. These are done inside pure virtual functions from the base class.

Now, when the user creates, uses and is finished with the object, he should call the Done function (from base class), which will do cleanup and resource de-allocation. Part of this cleanup is to call a number of API-level functions -- these naturally are pure virtuals in the base class and implemented in the derived classes. So far so good.

Here's the problem. If the user does not explicitly call Done there will be various memory leaks due to resources not being properly freed. So, I figured I'd make it easy and call Done from ~BaseClass() - automatic cleanup on destruction, i thought. Well, not so much. Since Done makes calls to these pure virtuals all hell breaks loose.

Any thoughts on how to re-design this to avoid this issue?

example code

class BaseClass{ 
  virtual ~BaseClass(){
    Done();
  }
  void Done(){
    // A bunch of OS-independent clean-up logic
    Cleanup();
    // some more OS-independent clean-up logic
  }
  virtual void Cleanup() = 0;
};
class Win32Class : public BaseClass{
  virtual void Cleanup(){
    // call some Win32-specific cleanup code
  }
};
class LinuxClass : public BaseClass{
  virtual void Cleanup(){
    // call some Linux-specific cleanup code
  }
};

==========================================
Here's my solution. Use a wrapper class. Don;t call Done in the destructor of Win32Class or BaseClass

class Win32Wrapper{
public:
  Win32Class* object_;
public:
  Win32Wrapper(){
    this->object_ = new Win32Class;
  }
  ~Win32Wrapper(){
    this->object_->Done();
    delete this->object_;
  }
};

== How to Call Pure Virtuals in a destructor ==

class Base{
public:
  Base(){
  }
  virtual ~Base(){
    Done();
  }
  void Done(){
    Clean();
  }
  virtual void Clean() = 0;
};

class Derived : public Base{
public:  
  Derived(){
  }
  ~Derived(){
  }
  virtual void Clean(){
  }
};

The user thinks that the program will work, because the compiler doesn't complain about the call to a PFV in Base::Done().

share|improve this question
    
Without seeing some example code, it's difficult to say exactly. I suspect, though, that you need to make ~BaseClass() virtual. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 6 '12 at 23:28
2  
@Code-Guru: That has nothing to do with the problem. –  Kerrek SB Nov 6 '12 at 23:29
    
@KerrekSB As I said, I don't know for sure and was making a guess. Thanks for clarifying that I don't know what I'm talking about. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 6 '12 at 23:30
    
I added some example code for you (and all) @Code-Guru –  Piotr Nov 7 '12 at 18:09
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can put the clean-up code in the derived destructors:

struct Base
{
    virtual ~Base() { }

    void CleanUp() { /* ... */ }
};

struct Derived : Base
{
    virtual ~Derived()
    {
        CleanUp();
    }
};

If you want, you can even put calls to further virtuals into the non-virtual Base::CleanUp() function to allow for derived-specific behaviour (though by your description it sounds like you don't need that).

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how this helps anything (but I don't understand the problem, either). –  Travis Gockel Nov 6 '12 at 23:41
    
This is how I had it implemented. However. And yes, In my case the CleanUp function will be making calls to pure virtuals derived from Base, and implemented in Derived - which causes bad things to happen. –  Piotr Nov 7 '12 at 17:57
    
I take that back that was NOT the way I had it implemented first. I had the virtual ~Base calling Cleanup which I assume caused the havoc -- then i moved the Cleanup call to the ~Derived function and removed it from the ~Base - which is what you suggested as well. –  Piotr Nov 7 '12 at 18:06
    
So i guess there's no way around it then... The user HAS to explicitly call Done() when the object is about to be destroyed? –  Piotr Nov 7 '12 at 20:15
    
@Piotr What bad things happened? –  Code-Apprentice Nov 7 '12 at 23:20
show 7 more comments

I think the RAII idiom is what you are looking for.

You can find a quite comprehensive description of this here: http://www.hackcraft.net/raii/

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You have two options.

  1. The user of BaseClass has to call Done(), and any bugs due to not doing it are his responsibility.
  2. Each of the derived classes performs whatever cleanup is needed in their destroctors. They can use BaseClass functions in their cleanup, and the BaseClass functions can even call functions that are overridden by the derived class.
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