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<button onclick="isleap(1992)">Try it</button>​

function isleap(year);
{
var yr=document.getElementById("year").value;
if ((parseInt(yr)%4) == 0)
{
 if (parseInt(yr)%100 == 0)
 {
 if (parseInt(yr)%400 != 0)
 {
 alert("Not Leap");
 return "false";
 }
  if (parseInt(yr)%400 == 0)
  {
  alert("Leap");
    return "true";
    }
  }
  if (parseInt(yr)%100 != 0)
  {
    alert("Leap");
    return "true";
  }
 }
 if ((parseInt(yr)%4) != 0)
 {
    alert("Not Leap");
    return "false";
 } 
}

http://jsfiddle.net/kcyCd/

Having problems figuring out how to get the code to popup the alert box with the answer to the leap year.

share|improve this question
    
Why are you doing this? var yr=document.getElementById("year").value;. You are passing 1992 and then looking for a div with the id 1992? –  climbage Nov 7 '12 at 0:07
    
You can greatly simplify your code. Do the parseInt() once at the beginning, then do whatever it is you need to do if the value being tested isn't an integer, and then you can do the leap year test in just one line: if (yr%4===0 && (yr%100!=0 || yr%400===0)) { /* is leapyear */ } –  nnnnnn Nov 7 '12 at 0:13
    
@nnnnnn—yes, they function can be a lot more concise, e.g. !(yr%1000)||!(!(yr%100)||yr%4) but damn that gets hard to read. :-) –  RobG Nov 7 '12 at 0:33
    
@RobG - I don't find my version hard to read. Especially since any time you see a variable called something like year or yr being used with %4 you know it's likely to be a leap year test. Even a non-descriptive variable name used with %4, %100 and %400 is obviously part of a leap year test. I found your version (in the comment, not your answer) rather more confusing, not to mention incorrect. Years divisible by 100 are not leap years unless also divisible by 400. –  nnnnnn Nov 7 '12 at 0:39
    
@nnnnnn—yes, I was referring to the one in my comment. Bit of a brain fade, replace %1000 with %400. Hey, one less character! –  RobG Nov 7 '12 at 5:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A simple isLeapYear function is:

function isLeapYear(year) {
  var d = new Date(year, 1, 29);
  return d.getMonth() == 1;
}

It just sees if 29 February occurs in the given year. You should be able to do:

function isLeapYear2(year) {
  return !!Date.parse(year + '-02-29');
}

on the basis that parsing an invalid date should return NaN, which type-converts to false, but not all browsers correctly implement Date.parse. e.g.

isLeapYear2('2001'); // false in Firefox, true in IE
share|improve this answer
    
Works well cheers –  WherEmEweeD Nov 7 '12 at 0:27
<button onclick="alert(isleap(1992));">Try it</button>

If you alert the value returned from the isleap function it should work. I'm not guaranteeing the answer that pops up will be correct though.

share|improve this answer

Your fiddle doesn't work because you've kept the default jsfiddle setting that places your JS in an onload handler, which means your function isn't global and isn't accessible from the inline onclick attribute - this should be changed in the drop-down on the left to one of the "no wrap" settings. Also, the first thing the function would do if called is try to read the value from an element with id "year" and you have no such element. You currently ignore the year parameter.

Having said that, your function is way more complicated than it needs to be. You can greatly simplify your code by doing the parseInt() once at the beginning, then do whatever it is you need to do if the value being tested isn't an integer, and then you can do the leap year test in just one line.

Also, if you're using parseInt() on user input you must specify a radix as the second parameter if you want to avoid obscure bugs due to input starting with a leading zero being treated as octal. So parseInt(year, 10).

Finally, why return strings "true" and "false"? Wouldn't it make more sense to return actual booleans so that you can call your function as:

if (isleap(1992)) {
   // do something
}

Anyway, here's a short version:

function isleap(year) {
    year = parseInt(year,10);
    if (isNaN(year)) {
       alert("Not a number");
       return false;
    }
    if (year%4===0 && (year%100!=0 || year%400===0)) {
       alert("Leap");
       return true;
    } else {
       alert("Not leap");
       return false;
    }
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/kcyCd/1/

If you didn't need to display the alert you could make it shorter still:

function isleap(year) {
    year = parseInt(year,10);
    if (isNaN(year)) {
       alert("Not a number");
       return false;
    }
    return (year%4===0 && (year%100!=0 || year%400===0));
}

And obviously it would be a one-liner if you didn't need to test for invalid values.

share|improve this answer

You're passing a value into the function, and then looking for a different value in the DOM that doesn't exist.

Also, the code is hard to follow since you merged true/false conditionals, and you're using a string instead of a boolean - which is bad, because if(isleap(1992)) will always be true in your code.

Simplified:

function isleap(year)
{
    if(year % 4 == 0 || (year % 100 == 0 && year % 400 == 0)){
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
cheers, used this code. –  WherEmEweeD Nov 7 '12 at 0:26
    
The test isn't quite right: years divisible by 100 are not leap years unless also divisible by 400. –  nnnnnn Nov 7 '12 at 0:43
    
Updated test - thanks nnnnn –  jvenema Nov 8 '12 at 1:50

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