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I'm looking for a linux command that will let me find out more about the vibration motor component on a phone.

You can do pretty good introspection on hardware by looking in /proc, and also seeing what kernel modules are loaded. For example, this lists the interrupt numbers currently in use on my Droid phone ("adb shell" to my phone)

1|shell@cdma_spyder:/proc $ cat interrupts
cat interrupts
           CPU0       CPU1
 41:          0          0       GIC  l3-dbg-irq
 42:          0          0       GIC  l3-app-irq
 43:       9226          0       GIC  prcm
 44:      47509          0       GIC  DMA
 52:          0          0       GIC  gpmc
 53:     216846          0       GIC  SGX ISR
 57:       2045          0       GIC  OMAP DISPC
 58:        126          0       GIC
 60:          0          0       GIC  omap-iommu.1
 69:     140651          0       GIC  gp timer
 77:          0          0       GIC  rproc-wdt
 79:          0          0       GIC  rproc-wdt
 85:       6368          0       GIC  omapdss_dsi1
 88:         29          0       GIC  omap_i2c
 89:       5317          0       GIC  omap_i2c
 90:        397          0       GIC  omap_hdq
 93:         10          0       GIC  omap_i2c
 94:         81          0       GIC  omap_i2c
102:       6054          0       GIC
104:      16254          0       GIC  OMAP UART0
105:         77          0       GIC
108:        402          0       GIC  ohci_hcd:usb2
109:       3338          0       GIC  ehci_hcd:usb1
112:        181          0       GIC  omap_wdt
115:        676          0       GIC  mmc0
118:      84283          0       GIC  mmc1
124:        819          0       GIC  musb-hdrc
125:        740          0       GIC  musb-hdrc
126:      65421          0       GIC  mmc2
131:         66          0       GIC  ABE
132:          0          0       GIC  omap-iommu.0
133:          0          0       GIC  OMAP HDMI
141:          0          0       GIC  McASP
142:          0          0       GIC  omap_emif
143:          0          0       GIC  omap_emif
152:          0          0       GIC  omap4-keypad
163:          0          0      GPIO  wrigley_ctrl-reset
166:          5          0      GPIO  msp430_irq
167:       7115          0      GPIO  cpcap-irq
168:          0          0      GPIO  mdm_bp_resout
202:          6          0      GPIO  cy8c201xx
212:          0          0      GPIO  mdm_bp_status0
213:          0          0      GPIO  mdm_bp_status1
215:          1          0      GPIO  mdm_bp_status2
222:         38          0      GPIO  oob-wake-host-wake
223:          0          0      GPIO  hpd
260:       6728          0      GPIO  wl1271
275:          8          0      GPIO  usb_wake_host
309:       2909          0      GPIO  Remote Wakeup
336:          0          0      GPIO  mmc0
337:        140          0      GPIO  ct405
338:          0          0      GPIO  pcb_temp_sensor
343:        525          0      GPIO  atmxt-i2c
IPI0:          0          0  Timer broadcast interrupts
IPI1:     392542     449194  Rescheduling interrupts
IPI2:          0          0  Function call interrupts
IPI3:      66924      67462  Single function call interrupts
IPI4:          0          0  CPU stop interrupts
IPI5:          0          0  CPU backtrace
LOC:     538193     484328  Local timer interrupts
Err:          0
shell@cdma_spyder:/proc $



$ cat modules
wl12xx_sdio 4046 0 - Live 0xbf0c6000
vpnclient 67812 1 - Live 0xbf0b0000
btwilink 3462 0 - Live 0xbf0ac000
wl12xx 133371 1 wl12xx_sdio, Live 0xbf081000
mac80211 220250 1 wl12xx, Live 0xbf03d000
cfg80211 163244 2 wl12xx,mac80211, Live 0xbf009000
compat 2530 0 - Live 0xbf005000
evfwd 4650 0 - Live 0xbf000000
shell@cdma_spyder:/proc $

However, I cannot tie any of those chip names to the vibration motor. (E.g. by googling, "cy8c201" is a programmable system on chip SoC from Cypress which can control other IO devices http://www.ic-on-line.cn/view_online.php?id=1691996&file=0347\cy8c20134_2665305.pdf ) I'm guessing that the vibe motor is attached to that or some other controller chip (or maybe i2C ?) and that controller chip is assigned to one of the interrupts above.

So, any ideas on how to get the next layer of info down? I am OK with writing a C program, or using gdb to get more info on where the vibe motor is and what component it is. Any info is welcome

share|improve this question

The vibrator in at least some phones is actually an audio device. This is certainly the case with the TI TWL4040 and TWL6040 which are TI's audio companion ICs for OMAP3 and 4 respectively. There is no insight about as to whether your device does, but it's certainly got other components of the OMAP4 reference platform.

If you fire up alsamixer, you might well find some mixer settings related to the vibrator.

If a separate PCM audio output is used to drive it,

aplay -l

might provide some insights.

The Cypress part is a touch-screen controller.

Another useful place to engage in reverse engineering in sysfs.

share|improve this answer

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