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I have the following class and corresponding header file:

#ifndef ORDER_H_
#define ORDER_H_

#include "Side.h"

using namespace std;

class Order {
public:
    int _id;
       Side _side;
       int _ackedPrc;
       int _ackedQty;
       int _requestedPrc;
       int _requestedQty;
       int _filledQty;

       Order(){
           _id = -1;
           _side = BID;
           _ackedPrc = -1;
           _ackedQty = 0;
           _requestedPrc = 0;
           _requestedQty = 0;
           _filledQty = 0;
       }
       void cancel(){
           _requestedQty = 0;
       }
       void amend(int prc, int qty){
           _requestedPrc = prc;
           _requestedQty = qty;
       }
       void amended(){
           _ackedPrc = _requestedPrc;
           _ackedQty = _requestedQty;
       }
       void acked(){
           amended();
       }
       void onFill(int fillQty){
           _filledQty += fillQty;
       }
       int filledQty(){
           return _filledQty;
       }
       int prc(){
           return _requestedQty;
       }
       int remainingQty(){
           return _requestedQty - _filledQty;
       }
       int id(){
           return _id;
       }
       Side side(){
           return _side;
       }
       bool pendingMod(){
           return _ackedPrc != _requestedPrc || _ackedQty != _requestedQty;
       }

};
#endif

#ifndef ORDER_H_
#define ORDER_H_
#include "Side.h"

class Order {
public:
    int _id;
    Side _side;
    int _ackedPrc;
    int _ackedQty;
    int _requestedPrc;
    int _requestedQty;
    int _filledQty;

    Order();
    void cancel();
    void amend(int prc, int qty);
    void amended();
    void acked();
    void onFill(int fillQty);
    int filledQty();
    int prc();
    int remainingQty();
    int id();
    Side side();
    bool pendingMod();
};

#endif /* ORDER_H_ */

When I try to instantiate this object, I get the symbol(s) not found error in CDT/Eclipse on my Mac. However, I can easily instantiate any other class in the project, so I'm pretty sure my problem lies with the Order class:

int main() {
   Order o;//This gives me an error
//   OrderBook ob; But this works
//   QuoteBook qb; And this works
    return 0;
}

Can anyone spot my problem? I keep thinking that somewhere my declaration doesn't match my definition somewhere, but I don't see how. (And yes, I'm a C++ newb. Pardon any best-practices violations.)

Thanks

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A Java programmer by any chance? By the look of your code, you've actually declared the Order class twice. In C++ you usually declare a class and then you define the member variables and functions in it. Actually, you can declare and define in one like your first declaration of Order, but it's not normally good practice unless the code is very brief. In any case I'd suggest that your header should look like this:

#ifndef ORDER_H_
#define ORDER_H_
#include "Side.h"

class Order {
public:
    int _id;
    Side _side;
    int _ackedPrc;
    int _ackedQty;
    int _requestedPrc;
    int _requestedQty;
    int _filledQty;

    Order();
    void cancel();
    void amend(int prc, int qty);
    void amended();
    void acked();
    void onFill(int fillQty);
    int filledQty();
    int prc();
    int remainingQty();
    int id();
    Side side();
    bool pendingMod();
};

#endif /* ORDER_H_ */

This still has the include guards in so it'll only be included once in any compilation unit. Now your cpp file (with the definitions in it) shoudl probably look something like this:

#include <Order.hpp>

Order::Order(){
    _id = -1;
    _side = BID;
    _ackedPrc = -1;
    _ackedQty = 0;
    _requestedPrc = 0;
    _requestedQty = 0;
    _filledQty = 0;
}
void Order::cancel(){
    _requestedQty = 0;
}
void Order::amend(int prc, int qty){
    _requestedPrc = prc;
    _requestedQty = qty;
}
void Order::amended(){
    _ackedPrc = _requestedPrc;
    _ackedQty = _requestedQty;
}
void Order::acked(){
    amended();
}
void Order::onFill(int fillQty){
    _filledQty += fillQty;
}
int Order::filledQty(){
    return _filledQty;
}
int Order::prc(){
    return _requestedQty;
}
int Order::remainingQty(){
    return _requestedQty - _filledQty;
}
int Order::id(){
    return _id;
}
Side Order::side(){
    return _side;
}
bool Order::pendingMod(){
    return _ackedPrc != _requestedPrc || _ackedQty != _requestedQty;
}

Please note that I've clearly not tested this at all. The main thing to note is that here are the bodies of your Order class functions. Notice that the names have to be scoped within the Order class. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I see. (And yes, I am a Java programmer making the transition.) So, your changed fixed the problem. Thanks for that. However, now I'm wondering why I didn't get the same error when I constructed those other objects, like OrderBook? I did all my classes that (wrong) way? –  piyo Nov 7 '12 at 17:37
    
@piyo: Without seeing the structure of the project, the compile / link command with flags and the actual error, it's hard to tell. Your code was not actually wrong in that the first declaration of Order would have worked but putting all into a header will give you certain problems in C++. Best to keep the definitions in .cpp files and the declarations in the headers (.h/.hpp) The error you mention sounds like a link error (rather than compile) meaning that a required symbol can't be found within the object files that you're linking together. –  Component 10 Nov 8 '12 at 0:07

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