Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote some sample test code to verify the functionality of using boost upgrade mutexes to implement a read/write mutex lock over a boost list container. I have ten threads, 5 are readers, 5 are writers.
I used smart pointers to simplify memory management and allow the same object to be contained in multiple lists. The writers are constantly removing and re-inserting objects into their respective list while the readers are periodically iterating through the list. It all seems to work as expected but when calling the list erase member function it is having to find the entry to delete when I already have it.
Is the erase method smart enough to know the entry to be erased without having to search for it again or is it optimized to eliminate the search when the list element is known? If it does the search, then is there a straightforward way to extend it so a unique lock can be applied only around the actual removal from the list and not also while finding the list element? Here is the code I linked with boost 1.51 library and tested with vs2008.

  //******************************************************************************
  // INCLUDE FILES
  //******************************************************************************
  #include <boost/thread.hpp>
  #include <boost/date_time.hpp>
  #include <boost/thread/locks.hpp>  
  #include <boost/thread/shared_mutex.hpp>                  
  #include <boost/container/list.hpp>      
  #include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
  #include <boost/make_shared.hpp>
  #include <iostream>

  using namespace std;

  //******************************************************************************
  // LOCAL DEFINES
  //******************************************************************************
  #define NUM_THREADS  10
  #define NUM_WIDTH    5

  #ifdef UNIQUE_MUTEX
  #define MAIN_LIST_MUTEX           g_listMutex
  #define INT_LIST_MUTEX            g_intListMutex
  #define FLOAT_LIST_MUTEX          g_floatListMutex
  #else
  #define MAIN_LIST_MUTEX           g_listMutex
  #define INT_LIST_MUTEX            g_listMutex
  #define FLOAT_LIST_MUTEX          g_listMutex
  #endif

  //******************************************************************************
  // LOCAL TYPEDEFS
  //******************************************************************************
  typedef boost::upgrade_mutex                   myMutex;
  typedef boost::shared_lock<myMutex>            SharedLock;
  typedef boost::upgrade_to_unique_lock<myMutex> UniqueLock;
  typedef boost::upgrade_lock<myMutex>           UpgradeLock;
  class myDataIntf;
  typedef boost::shared_ptr<myDataIntf>          myDataIntfPtr;
  typedef boost::container::list<myDataIntfPtr>  myList;

  //******************************************************************************
  // LOCAL CLASS DECLARATIONS
  //******************************************************************************
  class myDataIntf
  {
  public:
     virtual char* getDataType(void) = 0;
  };

  class intData : public myDataIntf
  {
  private:
     int  data;

  public:
     intData(int new_data) : data(new_data){};
     ~intData(void)
     {
        extern int instIntDeletes;

        instIntDeletes++;
     };
     char* getDataType(void)
     {
        return "Int";
     }
     int getData(void)
     {
        return data;
     }
     void setData(int new_data)
     {
        data = new_data;
     }
  };

  class floatData : public myDataIntf
  {
  private:
     float  data;

  public:
     floatData(float new_data) : data(new_data){};
     ~floatData(void)
     {
        extern int instFloatDeletes;

        instFloatDeletes++;
     };
     char* getDataType(void)
     {
        return "Float";
     }
     float getData(void)
     {
        return data;
     }
     void setData(float new_data)
     {
        data = new_data;
     }
  };

  //******************************************************************************
  // LOCALLY DEFINED GLOBAL DATA
  //******************************************************************************

  // Define one mutex per linked list
  myMutex  g_listMutex;
  myMutex  g_intListMutex;
  myMutex  g_floatListMutex;

  int instReadFloatCount[NUM_THREADS];
  int instWriteFloatCount[NUM_THREADS];
  int instReadIntCount[NUM_THREADS];
  int instWriteIntCount[NUM_THREADS];
  int instFloatDeletes = 0;
  int instIntDeletes = 0;

  //******************************************************************************
  // Worker Thread function
  //******************************************************************************
  void workerFunc(int inst, myList* assigned_list, myMutex*  mutex)
  {
     boost::posix_time::millisec workTime(1*inst);
     myList::iterator            i;
     int                         add_delay = 0;
     int                         add_f_count = 0;
     int                         add_i_count = 0;

     instReadFloatCount[inst] = 0;
     instReadIntCount[inst] = 0;
     instWriteIntCount[inst] = 0;
     instWriteFloatCount[inst] = 0;

     mutex->lock();
     cout << "Worker " << inst << ": ";
     for (i =  assigned_list->begin(); i != assigned_list->end(); ++i)
     {
        cout << (*i)->getDataType();
        if ( 0 == strcmp("Float", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
        {
           floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData() << " ";
        }
        if ( 0 == strcmp("Int", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
        {
           intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData() << " ";
        }
     }
     cout << endl;
     mutex->unlock();

     // Do some work for 10 seconds.
     for ( int tick = 0; tick < 10000/(1*inst+1); tick++)
     {
        add_delay++;
        boost::this_thread::sleep(workTime);
        if ( inst < (NUM_THREADS/2) )
        {
           // reader - Get a shared lock that allows multiple readers to
           // access the linked list. Upgrade locks act as shared locks
           // until converted to unique locks, at which point the 
           // thread converting to the unique lock will block until
           // all existing readers are done.  New readers will wait
           // after the unique lock is released.
           SharedLock shared_lock(*mutex);

           for (i =  assigned_list->begin(); i != assigned_list->end(); ++i)
           {
              if ( 0 == strcmp("Float", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
              {
                 floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
                 instReadFloatCount[inst]++;
              }
              if ( 0 == strcmp("Int", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
              {
                 intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
                 instReadIntCount[inst]++;
              }
           }
        }
        else
        {
           // writer - get the upgrade lock that will allow us
           // to make multiple modifications to the linked list
           // without being interrupted by other writers (other writers attempting
           // to get an upgrade lock will block until the writer that
           // has it releases it.)
           UpgradeLock  upgrade_lock(*mutex);

           for (i =  assigned_list->begin(); i != assigned_list->end(); )
           {
              if ( 0 == strcmp("Float", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
              {
                 floatData*   f = (floatData*)i->get();
                 UniqueLock   unique_lock(upgrade_lock); // Convert an existing upgrade lock to unique lock

                 f->setData(f->getData() + 0.123f);
                 assigned_list->push_front(*i); 
                 assigned_list->erase(i++);
                 instWriteFloatCount[inst]++;

                 // While the unique lock is in scope let's do some additional
                 // adds & deletes
                 if ( (add_delay > 100) && (add_f_count < 2) )
                 {
                    if ( add_f_count < 1)
                    {
                       // Delete the first record
                    }
                    else if ( add_f_count < 2)
                    {
                       // Add new item using separate allocations for smart pointer & data
                       assigned_list->insert(assigned_list->end(), new floatData(-(float)(inst*10000+add_f_count)));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                       // Add new item using make_shared function template.  Both objects are created using one allocation.
                       assigned_list->insert(assigned_list->end(), boost::make_shared<floatData>(-(float)(inst*10000+add_f_count)));
                    }
                    add_f_count++;
                 }
              }
              else if ( 0 == strcmp("Int", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
              {
                 intData*     f = (intData*)i->get();
                 UniqueLock   unique_lock(upgrade_lock); // Convert an existing upgrade lock to unique lock

                 f->setData(f->getData() + 123);
                 assigned_list->push_front(*i);
                 assigned_list->erase(i++);
                 instWriteIntCount[inst]++;

                 // While the unique lock is in scope let's do some additional
                 // adds & deletes
                 if ( (add_delay > 100) && (add_i_count < 3) )
                 {
                    if ( add_i_count < 1)
                    {
                       // Delete the first record
                    }
                    else if ( add_i_count < 2)
                    {
                       // Add new item using separate allocations for smart pointer & data
                       assigned_list->insert(assigned_list->end(), new intData(-(int)(inst*10000+add_i_count)));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                       // Add new item using make_shared function template.  Both objects are created using one allocation.
                       assigned_list->insert(assigned_list->end(), boost::make_shared<intData>(-(int)(inst*10000+add_i_count)));
                    }
                    add_i_count++;
                 }
              }
              else
              {
                 ++i;
              }
           }
        }
     }

     cout << "Worker: finished" << " " << inst << endl;
  }

  //******************************************************************************
  // Main Function
  //******************************************************************************
  int main(int argc, char* argv[])
  {
     {
        myList              test_list;
        myList              test_list_ints;
        myList              test_list_floats;
        myList::iterator    i;

        // Fill the main list with some values
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new intData(1));
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new intData(2));
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new intData(3));
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new floatData(333.333f));
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new floatData(555.555f));
        test_list.insert(test_list.end(), new floatData(777.777f));

        // Display the main list elements and add the specific values
        // for each specialized list containing specific types of elements.
        // The end result is that each object in the main list will also
        // be in the specialized list.
        cout << "test:";
        for (i =  test_list.begin(); i != test_list.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           if ( 0 == strcmp("Float", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
           {
              floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
              cout << " " << f->getData();
              test_list_floats.insert(test_list_floats.end(), *i);
           }
           if ( 0 == strcmp("Int", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
           {
              intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
              cout << " " << f->getData();
              test_list_ints.insert(test_list_ints.end(), *i);
           }
        }
        cout << endl;

        // Display the list with float type elements
        cout << "float test:";
        for (i =  test_list_floats.begin(); i != test_list_floats.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData();
        }
        cout << endl;

        // Display the list with integer type elements
        cout << "int test:";
        for (i =  test_list_ints.begin(); i != test_list_ints.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData();
        }
        cout << endl;

        // NOTE: To reduce mutex bottleneck coupling in a real application it is recommended that
        // each linked list have it's own shareable mutex.
        // I used the same mutex here for all three lists to have the output from each thread
        // appear in a single line. If I use one mutex per thread then it would appear
        // jumbled up and almost unreadable.
        // To use a unique mutex per list enable UNIQUE_MUTEX macro.
        // For this test I did not notice any performance differences, but that will
        // depend largely on how long the unique lock is held.
        boost::thread workerThread0(workerFunc, 0, &test_list,        &MAIN_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread1(workerFunc, 1, &test_list_ints,   &INT_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread2(workerFunc, 2, &test_list_floats, &FLOAT_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread3(workerFunc, 3, &test_list,        &MAIN_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread4(workerFunc, 4, &test_list_floats, &FLOAT_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread5(workerFunc, 5, &test_list_ints,   &INT_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread6(workerFunc, 6, &test_list,        &MAIN_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread7(workerFunc, 7, &test_list_floats, &FLOAT_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread8(workerFunc, 8, &test_list,        &MAIN_LIST_MUTEX);
        boost::thread workerThread9(workerFunc, 9, &test_list_ints,   &INT_LIST_MUTEX);
        workerThread0.join();
        workerThread1.join();
        workerThread2.join();
        workerThread3.join();
        workerThread4.join();
        workerThread5.join();
        workerThread6.join();
        workerThread7.join();
        workerThread8.join();
        workerThread9.join();

        cout << "*** Test End ***:";
        for (i =  test_list.begin(); i != test_list.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           if ( 0 == strcmp("Float", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
           {
              floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
              cout << " " << f->getData();
           }
           if ( 0 == strcmp("Int", (*i)->getDataType() ) )
           {
              intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
              cout << " " << f->getData();
           }
        }
        cout << endl;
        cout << "float test end:";
        for (i =  test_list_floats.begin(); i != test_list_floats.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           floatData*  f = (floatData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData();
        }
        cout << endl;
        cout << "int test end:";
        for (i =  test_list_ints.begin(); i != test_list_ints.end(); ++i)
        {
           cout << " " << (*i)->getDataType();
           intData*  f = (intData*)i->get();
           cout << " " << f->getData();
        }
        cout << endl;
        cout << "*** thread counts***" << endl;
        for ( int idx = 0; idx < NUM_THREADS; idx++)
        {
           cout << "    thread " << idx;
           cout << ": int rd(" << setw(NUM_WIDTH) << instReadIntCount[idx];
           cout << ") int wr(" << setw(NUM_WIDTH) << instWriteIntCount[idx];
           cout << ") flt rd(" << setw(NUM_WIDTH) << instReadFloatCount[idx];
           cout << ") flt wr(" << setw(NUM_WIDTH) << instWriteFloatCount[idx];
           cout << ")" <<  endl;
        }
     }

     // All records in the linked list have now been deallocated automatically(due to smart pointer)
     // as the linked list objects have been destroyed due to going out of scope.  
     cout << "*** Object Deletion counts***" << endl;
     cout << "  int deletes: " << instIntDeletes << endl;
     cout << "float deletes: " << instFloatDeletes << endl;

     return 0;
  }
share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The complexity of boost::container::list::erase(const_iterator) is amortised constant time (search for iterator erase(const_iterator p) in boost/container/list.hpp). So there is no repeat searching done when calling this function.

However, there are a couple of points I would make.

I was advised very recently by a concurrency expert that it's wise to use the UpgradeLockable Concept only after identifying a clear need for it; i.e. after profiling. The locks associated with upgrade_mutexes are necessarily more complex than simple boost::mutex::scoped_locks or std::lock_guards and hence suffer from poorer performance.

In your example, you'll probably find that there's no significant performance difference between your current (more complex) setup, and replacing the upgrade_mutex with mutex and just always exclusively locking.

The other point is that your code comments seem to indicate that you think several instances of a boost::upgrade_lock on a given upgrade_mutex can co-exist. This is not the case. Only a single thread may hold an upgrade_lock at a time.

Several other threads may hold shared_locks while an upgrade_lock is held, but these shared_locks must be released before the upgrade_lock can be upgraded to unique.

For further info, see the boost docs on the UpgradeLockable Concept.


Edit

Just to confirm the point made in the comments below, the following example shows that new shared_locks can be acquired while an upgrade_lock exists, but not while an upgrade_to_unique_lock exists (tested with boost 1.51):

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/thread.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/locks.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/shared_mutex.hpp>

typedef boost::shared_lock<boost::upgrade_mutex>            SharedLock;
typedef boost::upgrade_to_unique_lock<boost::upgrade_mutex> UniqueLock;
typedef boost::upgrade_lock<boost::upgrade_mutex>           UpgradeLock;

boost::upgrade_mutex the_mutex;

void Write() {
  UpgradeLock upgrade_lock(the_mutex);
  std::cout << "\tPreparing to write\n";
  boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(1));
  UniqueLock unique_lock(upgrade_lock);
  std::cout << "\tStarting to write\n";
  boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(5));
  std::cout << "\tDone writing.\n";
}

void Read() {
  SharedLock lock(the_mutex);
  std::cout << "Starting to read.\n";
  boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::seconds(1));
  std::cout << "Done reading.\n";
}

int main() {
  // Start a read operation
  std::vector<boost::thread> reader_threads;
  reader_threads.push_back(std::move(boost::thread(Read)));
  boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(250));

  // Start a write operation.  This will block trying to upgrade
  // the UpgradeLock to UniqueLock since a SharedLock currently exists.
  boost::thread writer_thread(Write);

  // Start several other read operations.  These won't be blocked
  // since only an UpgradeLock and SharedLocks currently exist.
  for (int i = 0; i < 25; ++i) {
    boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(100));
    reader_threads.push_back(std::move(boost::thread(Read)));
  }

  // Join the readers.  This allows the writer to upgrade to UniqueLock
  // since it's currently the only lock.
  for (auto& reader_thread : reader_threads)
    reader_thread.join();

  // Start a new read operation.  This will be blocked since a UniqueLock
  // currently exists.
  boost::this_thread::sleep(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(100));
  boost::thread reader_thread(Read);

  writer_thread.join();
  reader_thread.join();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Fraser, I corrected the comment regarding how the locks work. As far as I understand from the boost documentation, multiple shared locks and a single upgrade lock can co-exist. The thing is that new shared locks while the upgrade lock is active while block until the upgrade lock is released, this ensures that the upgrade lock eventually can be converted into a unique lock. Multiple writers attempting to get an upgrade lock will block until the current upgrade lock is released, but only one can get it at any time. –  Ricardo Andujar Nov 7 '12 at 14:36
    
Also, regarding the performance, I understand that there is an overhead associated with it, but in my application most of the time there will only be reader locks, and occasional writer locks. The main goal was to minimize performance impacts on the threads iterating through the list with the reader locks. By using the shared read lock multiple threads can iterate on the same list, contention being handled by thread priority (this WC7 so the scheduler is strictly preemptive based on priority). –  Ricardo Andujar Nov 7 '12 at 14:40
    
@RicardoAndujar There's nothing to stop new shared_locks being acquired while an upgrade_lock exists. What's more, an attempt to upgrade to a unique_lock will block until all the shared_locks are released. While the writer is waiting to upgrade the lock, more readers can acquire shared_locks. So you could get the case where there are so many readers that there is always a shared_lock, meaning the writer will never get the chance to acquire the unique_lock. And from there you're into try_lock or timed variants territory - more complexity. –  Fraser Nov 7 '12 at 20:12
    
Fraser, the only thing I need to do is figure out if there is any need to encapsulate the list code with sw to automatically perform the locking, but at this point I only see the need to make the mutex a part of a derived list class. Thanks for the response. –  Ricardo Andujar Nov 7 '12 at 21:23
    
I tested it out, and it did appear that new readers where being blocked behind the upgraded lock. I believe your description matches an earlier version of the upgrade lock, but I will need to perform some more tests to confirm it. I am basing this response on the debugger information that shows active reader locks and waiting reader locks at the same time while only an upgrade lock exists. –  Ricardo Andujar Nov 7 '12 at 21:30
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.