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Right code example:

#include "Python.h"
#include <string>

extern const int someConstant;

void some_function()
{
  const char *begin = NULL;
  const char *end = NULL;

  std::string s(begin, end);
  const int v = someConstant;
}

static PyMethodDef _G_methods[] =
{
    {NULL, NULL, 0, NULL}        /* Sentinel */
};

PyMODINIT_FUNC initsf()
{
  PyObject *module;

  if (!(module = Py_InitModule("sf", _G_methods)))
  {
    return;
  }

  PyObject *pyerror = PyErr_NewException("fs.error", NULL, NULL);
  Py_INCREF(pyerror);


  PyModule_AddObject(module, "error", pyerror);
}

This is extension module draft. As simple as possible. It has an empty method table and initializer function copied from original docpage. It contains 2 (two) intentional errors:

  • variable someConstant declared but never defined;

  • function some_function defined, but never called;

If compiled and opened by dlopen/dlsym:

sf.so: undefined symbol: someConstant

as required. But if loaded by Python interpreter:

>>> from sf import *
Segmentation fault (core dumped)

and the most strange is python's backtrace dumped from core-file:

#0  0x00000bd6 in ?? ()
#1  0xb775c057 in char* std::string::_S_construct<char const*>(char const*, char const*, std::allocator<char> const&, std::forward_iterator_tag) () from /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/sf.so
#2  0xb6f9abb6 in std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&) () from /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6
#3  0xb6c3fe30 in pkgInitConfig(Configuration&) () from /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libapt-pkg.so.4.12
#4  0xb6cf959e in ?? () from /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/apt_pkg.so
#5  0x081949c1 in PyEval_EvalFrameEx ()
#6  0x0819af70 in PyEval_EvalCodeEx ()
#7  0x0819bb03 in PyImport_ExecCodeModuleEx ()
#8  0x0814bd40 in ?? ()
#9  0x080a38c2 in ?? ()
#10 0x0814c6d4 in ?? ()
#11 0x081031ae in ?? ()
...

It seems, Python's loader calls std::string constructor :-).

So, stack corrupted. It happens either while loading invalid module or while unloading it after error handled. It never happens if sample code is little changed. This behavior has been observed on Python 2.7.3/Linux Ubuntu 10/gcc 4.6.3 and definitely not shown on Python 2.7.1/FreeBSD 8.1/gcc 4.2.1.

Question:

  1. Is it a Python's bug or my sample code has errors?
share|improve this question
    
Why is std::string being initialised with a pair of NULL pointers, string(being, end);? –  damienh Nov 7 '12 at 1:33
    
For nothing. This is dummy and never called. But if I use only one pointer behavior changed, if I use non NULL pointer it changed too –  dyomas Nov 7 '12 at 1:38
1  
Did you ever figure this out? I'm having the same problem trying to run somebody else's code. –  mehaase Apr 17 '14 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

Let's look at that stack trace again

#0  0x00000bd6 in ?? ()
#1  0xb775c057 in char* std::string::_S_construct<char const*>(char const*, char const*, std::allocator<char> const&, std::forward_iterator_tag) () from /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/sf.so
#2  0xb6f9abb6 in std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&) () from /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libstdc++.so.6
#3  0xb6c3fe30 in pkgInitConfig(Configuration&) () from /usr/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libapt-pkg.so.4.12
#4  0xb6cf959e in ?? () from /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/apt_pkg.so

So a function in libapt-pkg.so calls a function in libstdc++.so which calls a function in your module.

Your functions are never getting called. However, your code uses std::string and instantiates some functions for std::string, those functions get included into your *.so, override those used by a completely different *.so, and crash for some reason I'm not entirely sure why.

My instincts tell me that you used gcc to create your *.so instead of g++. You won't get an error at link time because linking shared objects doesn't work that way. You won't get an error at load time because libstdc++ is coincidentally already loaded.

Are you using gcc or g++ to link? Try using g++.

share|improve this answer
    
There is a difference, indeed, which linker used. But results on the contrary to your instincts, Dietrich Epp :-) The above crash results obtained with g++ linker. Correct error handling occurs if I use gcc to link. –  dyomas Nov 7 '12 at 9:08
    
@dyomas: What do you mean by "correct error handling"? It looks like the presence of your module, when linked with g++, causes a completely unrelated module to crash when loaded -- not really an error handling problem, more of a catastrophic failure. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 7 '12 at 9:19
    
"correct error handling" means the following message from Python interpreter: "ImportError: /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/sf.so: undefined symbol: someConstant" and ready for execute next command (not SIGSEGV). This is desired and actual in case of gcc, but I see "catastrophic failure" when linked with g++. This is the truth, I'm satisfied, thanks :-) –  dyomas Nov 7 '12 at 11:57
    
Why is std::string::_S_construct() defined in sf.so? The OP's code doesn't define any constructors for std::string. –  mehaase Apr 17 '14 at 20:04
1  
@mehaase: Template functions and constructors (remember std::string is a template) can be instantiated anywhere. –  Dietrich Epp Apr 20 '14 at 3:31

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