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I am writing some image processing code and use C# to do low level pixel manipulation. Every once in a while, an accessViolationException happens.

There are several approaches to this typical problem, some think code should be written robustly so to not have access violation exceptions, and as far as I try, the application is going fine however I would like to add a try catch so that iff something were to happen, the application would not fail in too ugly of a way.

So far, I have put in some example code to test it out

unsafe
{
    byte* imageIn = (byte*)img.ImageData.ToPointer();
    int inWidthStep = img.WidthStep;
    int height = img.Height;
    int width = img.Width;
    imageIn[height * inWidthStep + width * 1000] = 100; // make it go wrong
}

When I put a try catch around this statement, I still get an exception. Is there a way to catch exceptions generated in an unsafe block?

Edit: as stated down below, this type of exception is no longer handled unless the checking of them is explicitly enabled by adding this attribute to the function and adding the "using System.Runtime.ExceptionServices".

[HandleProcessCorruptedStateExceptions]
    public void makeItCrash(IplImage img)
    {
        try
        {
            unsafe
            {
                byte* imageIn = (byte*)img.ImageData.ToPointer();
                int inWidthStep = img.WidthStep;
                int height = img.Height;
                int width = img.Width;
                imageIn[height * inWidthStep + width * 1000] = 100; // to make it crash
            }
        }
        catch(AccessViolationException e)
        {
            // log the problem and get out
        }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
"some think code should be written robustly so to not have access violation exceptions" -- it is not clear to me why code such as you have written cannot be written in such a way as to avoid exceptions. –  Kirk Woll Nov 7 '12 at 1:11
4  
So, why can't you look at the exception and fix the problem? –  John Saunders Nov 7 '12 at 1:11
4  
Fix the frigging problem FFs! Don't bury the bug! –  Mitch Wheat Nov 7 '12 at 1:12
1  
If you know you're writing to memory you're not allowed to write too.. surely you would fix the algorithm.. ? It's a clear problem with your algorithm.. fix it. –  Simon Whitehead Nov 7 '12 at 1:15
1  
If you're getting access violations you probably have damaged data. The program should commit suicide at that point. The only thing you should be doing at that point is logging and perhaps writing the data out to some crash file (Do NOT simply save changes, they might be corrupt!) –  Loren Pechtel Nov 7 '12 at 1:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check the sizes and return an ArgumentOutOfRangeException if the parameters make you write outside of the image.

An AccessViolationException is a Corrupted State Exception (CSE), not a Structured Exception Handling (SEH) exception. Starting with .NET 4, catch(Exception e) won't catch CSE's unless you specify it with an attribute. This is because you should write code that avoids CSE's in the first place. You can read more about it here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd419661.aspx#id0070035

share|improve this answer
    
In response to your edited answer, that's not a good solution. You will end up with a partially modified image as a side-effect. And if this is supposed to be time-critical and you're calling the method a bunch of times, exception handling will kill performance. –  Robert Rouhani Nov 7 '12 at 2:16
    
Agreed. Perhaps a better use of this is to write to a log file (would it possibly corrupt the data permanently if this was done?) and then exit instead of just exiting without any details on what happened? –  Denis Nov 7 '12 at 17:37
    
honestly, if you just do the bounds check you'll be fine since you'd be able to mathematically prove you won't write outside the proper bounds, but if you REALLY want to catch an exception here, make sure you're only catching AccessViolationException, write out a message about corrupt memory, then Environment.Exit(1);. With the bounds check, a hardware memory corruption is the only thing that can cause an access violation, and the chance of that happening is extremely low. –  Robert Rouhani Nov 7 '12 at 18:35

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