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i want to get third numbers from ip address(v4) using only regular expressions.

here is a lot of ips

172.23.34.159
172.23.34.51
211.234.202.246
147.6.41.120
172.23.34.171
10.225.149.118
172.23.34.64

is that possible?

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It would help if we knew what language you were doing this in. The regular expression itself simply matches a pattern. The way to "get" something out of a regex depends on the function you're using to apply the match. –  ghoti Nov 7 '12 at 3:07
    
@ghoti i use oracle SQL, for filter a column. want to make like 123.456.***.1 –  sannim Nov 7 '12 at 3:24

3 Answers 3

This should work at least with and :

\b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\K\d{1,3}(?=\.\d{1,3}\b)

Or if you want something stronger :

\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.\K(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)(?=\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b)

You can try it with

$ re='\b(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\.\K(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)(?=\.(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|[01]?[0-9][0-9]?)\b)'
$
$ perl -lne 'print $& if /'"$re"'/' file.txt
34
34
202
41
34
149
34
$ 
$ grep -oP "$re" file.txt
34
34
202
41
34
149
34
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In BRE:

/^[0-9]\{1,3\}\.[0-9]\{1,3\}\.\([0-9]\{1,3\}\)\.[0-9]\{1,3\}$/

Or in ERE:

/^[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.([0-9]+)\.[0-9]+$/

If you're using something like sed on older operating systems, you may be restricted to BRE. Note that not all regex implementations include backreferences, so you may be further ahead to use something else than regex to get this information. For example, in awk:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo "10.11.12.13" | awk -F. '{print $3}'
12

Or just pure bash:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ addr="10.11.12.13"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ addr=${addr#*.*.}
[ghoti@pc ~]$ addr=${addr%.*}
[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo $addr
12
share|improve this answer

When it comes to regexes the more you know about the data, the better equipped you will be to parse/modify it. For example if you have an array or a trusted file which you already know contains only IP addresses something as simple as (in Perl):

    my @ips = qw(172.23.34.159
                 172.23.34.51
                 211.234.202.246
                 147.6.41.120
                 172.23.34.171
                 10.225.149.118
                 172.23.34.64);
    for (@ips) {
        print "$1\n" if $_ =~ /(?:\d+\.){2}(\d+)\.\d+/;
    }

or

    while (<>) {
        print $1\n" if $_ =~ /^\s*(?:\d+\.){2}(\d+)\.\d+\s*$/;
    }

could suffice. Whereas if you are gathering the data from an outside source or a file with lots of different data types you would need to be more strict (in which case sputnick has already provided appropriately rigorous examples)

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