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I have seen in some python libraries a common pattern to use a class definition named Meta inside the object, like django Models or tastypie Resources. Also some others doesn't use this like Celery Tasks.

Is there any obvious reason for this? from the tastypie code I can see that some metaclass is playing with the inner Meta class definition. Is there any difference in meta-data and just plain attributes of the model? in django models is kind of easy to say: attributes are just the fields like age = IntegerField, but I can think in attribute called fields, or just use _attrs or __attrs for the metadata.

Is this consider a good practice?

Bye.

Edited:

I would like to add something to this:

Are there any more libraries approaching this in a similar way? or there are different ways to do the same? is there any common pattern in here that I could check? Thanks.

I want to start a library and I like both ways, and is not related too much with this two libraries, so there's not consistency issues with selecting one or the other

Bye.

share|improve this question

No, there is no other difference than just convention: TastyPie just uses the same convention Django models use to separate "data" from "metadata" (data about the data).

Metaclass and Meta class

Also, metaclass has access to both class attributes and inner classes, so this does not play any significant role.

Why not _attrs or __attrs?

You could name it _attrs (maybe not __attrs due to name-mangling mechanism), but the convention is different (and the leading underscore means the API is not public).

Why Meta in TastyPie?

As for the reason in case of TastyPie and Meta inner class for storing options, I suggest to watch the presentation of Daniel Lindsley (the creator of TastyPie) named "API Design Tips", that took place during latest DjangoCon US 2012: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKQzXu43hzY - it clearly shows the reasons for using this specific approach to building TastyPie's API.

A little bit about consistency

When it comes to "Is this considered a good practice?" part, I would quote part of PEP8 ("the style guide", especially part about consistency):

A style guide is about consistency. Consistency with this style guide is important. Consistency within a project is more important. Consistency within one module or function is most important.

So I would treat this approach (the approach in TastyPie) as a sign of consistency with the framework for which it was developed (namely: Django).

A word about good practice

And yes, it is a good practice (to be consistent). It is also a good practice to use naming convention from Python Style Guide (PEP8), because it is widely adopted. However, using Meta inner class is just a convention - if you are writing some extension for Celery Tasks, better stick to their naming convention to not confuse users.

share|improve this answer
    
Some good links to read/watch thanks. – sean Nov 7 '12 at 3:21
    
Thanks, I get the point with the consistency, it makes a lot of sense. I would like to change then a little bit my question, is there any more libraries approaching this in a similar way? or there are different ways to do the same? is there any common pattern in here that I could check? Thanks. I want to start a library and I like both ways, and is not related too much with this two libraries, so there's not consistency issues with selecting one or the other. – Jorge E. Cardona Nov 7 '12 at 18:22

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