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function redundantSee() {

  var optionSet1 = $('.wrapper:eq(0)'),
      optionSet2 = $('.wrapper:eq(1)');

  optionSet1.find('.options').each(function(){
      var self = $(this),
          input = self.find('input'),
          title = self.find('.title').text(),
          value = input.val(),
          source = self.find('img').attr('src'),
          id = input.attr('id'),
          listItem = $('<li/>', {'value': value, 'id': id }),
          imageElement = $('<img/>', {'src': source, 'title': title});

      $('div.corresponding1').append(nameListItem);
      listItem.append(imageElement);
  });

  optionSet2.find('.options').each(function(){
      var self = $(this),
          input = self.find('input'),
          title = self.find('.title').text(),
          value = input.val(),
          source = self.find('img').attr('src'),
          id = input.attr('id'),
          listItem = $('<li/>', {'value': value, 'id': id }),
          imageElement = $('<img/>', {'src': source, 'title': title});

      $('div.corresponding2').append(listItem);
      listItem.append(imageElement);
  });
}

I've simplified this for posting, since there are going to be more than 4 options sets for this function to cycle through.

I'm having a problem figuring out how to turn all of the repetitive code into something much more manageable.

But since each option set has it's own each loop, the $(this) variable (and all corresponding variables) are specific to the loop that is run on the ('.options') element.

If I do one each loop and use a counter, like this:

$('wrapper').each(function(i){ // ... });

I still run into the problem of needing to redeclare all my new variables specific to that optionSet's turn in the loop.

Can someone help me figure out how I can condense this so that I'm not constantly repeating the same code every time I add a new option set to the function?

Edit: The $('div.corresponding') elements are completely different for each one, so they can't be incremented with a counter. (ex. One might be $('div.foo') or $('div.foo ul.bar')

share|improve this question
2  
This belongs in codereview.stackexchange.com. –  jfriend00 Nov 7 '12 at 3:02
    
"If I do one each loop and use a counter...I still run into the problem of needing to redeclare all my new variables specific to that optionSet's turn in the loop" - Why is that? For the code you show, isn't the 'div.corresponding1' bit the only difference in the two loops? And you could handle that with a counter. –  nnnnnn Nov 7 '12 at 3:04
1  
You should create a function to be re-used. The parameters should be $elem ($(this)) and $container ($('div.correspondingx')) –  Matthew Blancarte Nov 7 '12 at 3:04
    
Ok... sorry about that, I'll move it on over –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 3:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could extend jQuery for example so its more reusable:

// extend jquery
(function($){

    $.fn.redundantSee = function (subSelector) {

        return this.find('.options').each(function () {
            var self = $(this),
            input = self.find('input'),
            title = self.find('.title').text(),
            value = input.val(),
            source = self.find('img').attr('src'),
            id = input.attr('id'),
            listItem = $('<li/>', { 'value': value, 'id': id }),
            imageElement = $('<img/>', { 'src': source, 'title': title });

            $(subSelector).append(listItem);
            listItem.append(imageElement);
        });

    };

}(jQuery));

// and use it like this
$('.wrapper:eq(0)').redundantSee('div.corresponding1');
$('.wrapper:eq(1)').redundantSee('div.corresponding2');
share|improve this answer
    
This is a good possibility... I'm gonna give it a shot! –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 3:16
    
I'm not going to be able to test this till tomorrow, however, I'm familiar with both extending jQuery and writing reusable functions to accept parameters (which is the way I was thinking of solving this). I'm pretty sure that I'll be able to implement by extending this way. My question for you is, is there any performance benefit of extending jQuery over writing a reusable parameterized function, or is it mostly best practice for chaining and reusability? –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 5:00
    
Its more about best practice, I don`t think there are any performance benefits. –  Predator Nov 7 '12 at 6:39
    
fyi, this works, but just wanted to mention that the first $(this) shouldn't be wrapped in jQuery, and when extending it is advised by the docs to wrap in an iife (benalman.com/news/2010/11/…), and it's also advised to return this for chaining: docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Authoring. But otherwise, a very good solution, thanks! –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 17:32
    
Thanks for your feedback. I changed the this parts, wasnt sure if this was already jQuery and forgot the return, yep, you're right. But I don't see the point for the IIFE as everything is inside the function and should be safe? Feel free to edit my answer and I will accept the changes. Oh and welcome to SO. You should get a name and get addicted, you will be a good addition to the guys here :) –  Predator Nov 8 '12 at 0:29

I would do a loop for the wrapper and a loop for the option in each wrapper And I would use a increment variable for the corresponding DIV.

function redundantSee() {
    var i = 0;
    $('.wrapper').each(function(){
        i++;
        $(this).find('.options').each(function(){
            var self = $(this),
                input = self.find('input'),
                title = self.find('.title').text(),
                value = input.val(),
                source = self.find('img').attr('src'),
                id = input.attr('id'),
                listItem = $('<li/>', {'value': value, 'id': id }),
                imageElement = $('<img/>', {'src': source, 'title': title});

            $('div.corresponding' + i).append(nameListItem);
            listItem.append(imageElement);
        });
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
The 'div.corresponding' is not something that can just be incremented, because for each one there is a completely different element with a different name... .sorry for the confusion on that. –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 3:15
    
@user1798630 if you are using html5 you can attach an data-* attribute on each wrapper to specify the corresponding DIV instead of increment it. –  EmeraldCoder Nov 7 '12 at 3:20
    
Actually I can't touch those wrappers... they are generated by a server so I can only manipulate with JavaScript –  LaserFace Nov 7 '12 at 3:23

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