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I'm trying to calculate the Pearson correlation correlation between every item in my list. I'm trying to get the correlations between data[0] and data[1], data[0] and data[2], and data[1] and data[2].

import scipy
from scipy import stats

data = [[1, 2, 4], [9, 5, 1], [8, 3, 3]]

def pearson(x, y):
    series1 = data[x]
    series2 = data[y]
    if x != y:
        return scipy.stats.pearsonr(series1, series2)

h = [pearson(x,y) for x,y in range(0, len(data))]

This returns the error TypeError: 'int' object is not iterable on h. Could someone please explain the error here? Thanks.

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The specific error comes from trying to assign x, y to an element of range(0, len(data))- each element of range is only a single integer, so you can't split it up and assign it to two variables. –  Marius Nov 7 '12 at 3:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

range will return you a list of int values while you are trying to use it like it returning you a tuple. Try itertools.combinations instead:

import scipy
from scipy import stats
from itertools import combinations

data = [[1, 2, 4], [9, 5, 1], [8, 3, 3]]

def pearson(x, y):
    series1 = data[x]
    series2 = data[y]
    if x != y:
        return scipy.stats.pearsonr(series1, series2)

h = [pearson(x,y) for x,y in combinations(len(data), 2)]

Or as @Marius suggested:

h = [stats.pearsonr(data[x], data[y]) for x,y in combinations(len(data), 2)]
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Trying to run h gives me this error: Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> File "<stdin>", line 2, in pearson TypeError: list indices must be integers, not list –  user1709173 Nov 7 '12 at 3:26
    
Sorry)) My fault. Fixed –  Artsiom Rudzenka Nov 7 '12 at 3:30
2  
You should be able to skip your self-defined pearson function and just do h = [scipy.stats.pearsonr(*comb) for comb in combinations(data, 2)] –  Marius Nov 7 '12 at 3:30
    
Thank you, both. –  user1709173 Nov 7 '12 at 3:32
    
@Marius - thanx, added –  Artsiom Rudzenka Nov 7 '12 at 3:32

Why not use numpy.corrcoef

import numpy as np
data = [[1, 2, 4], [9, 5, 1], [8, 3, 3]]  

Result:

>>> np.corrcoef(data)
array([[ 1.        , -0.98198051, -0.75592895],
       [-0.98198051,  1.        ,  0.8660254 ],
       [-0.75592895,  0.8660254 ,  1.        ]])
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The range() function will give you only an int for each iteration, and you can't assign an int to a pair of values.

If you want to go through every possible pair of possibilities of ints in that range you could try

import itertools

h = [pearson(x,y) for x,y in itertools.product(range(len(data)), repeat=2)]

That will combine all the possibilities in the given range in a tuple of 2 elements

Remember that, using that function you defined, when x==y you will have None values. To fix that you could use:

import itertools

h = [pearson(x,y) for x,y in itertools.permutations(range(len(data)), 2)]
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