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#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int *p=0;
    char *ch=0;
    p++;
    ch++;
    printf ("%d and %d\n",p,ch);
    return 0;
}

Output:

4 and 1
  1. I know the char pointer increments as +1 in the address that it is pointing too.

  2. I know the pointer to an int increments as +4 in the address in gcc that it is pointing too.

  3. I know Derefrencing a pointer should be done by the use of * with the pointer.

Queries:

  1. Why is this not giving any garbage value for p and ch as both are pointers and has not assigned any address;

  2. Why is this giving me the address difference that the respective pointer has obtained while incrementing, or is this a undefined behavior.

3.Why is the output 4 and 1?

Pl. Explain.

I have compiled this code on gcc-4.3.4. Its a C code. I am sorry if this comes out to be a copy of some question as I was not able to find any such question on stackoverflow.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First, your code is printing pointers as integers. While this is probably what you're trying to do, it is not defined behavior, as it is entirely unportable on platforms where the size of a pointer (in bytes) is not the same as the size of int. if you want to print pointer values, use %p instead.

To answer your questions. You are assigning values to both pointers: 0, which is synonymous with NULL.

Second. The reason you're getting 4 1 is due to the size of an int vs the size of a char on your platform. The char is going to be 1. On your platform, anint is 4 bytes wide. When incrementing a pointer the compiler will automatically move the address it references by the byte-count of the underlying type it represents.

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int *p=0;    // int is 4 bytes on your platform
    char *ch=0;  // char is 1 byte
    p++;         // increments the address in p by 4
    ch++;        // increments the address in ch by 1
    printf ("%d  and %d\n",p,ch);
    return 0;
}

EDIT: you're going to get the similar results, but with a supported print statement, do this instead:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int *p=0;
    char *ch=0;
    p++;
    ch++;
    printf ("%p and %p\n",p,ch);
    return 0;
}

Output (on my Mac) is:

0x4 and 0x1
share|improve this answer
    
So it is not a undefined behaviour. It will give me the same output according to the size of pointer, int and char on different machine. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 7 '12 at 4:02
1  
@tapasweni You need to read that again. Using printf() with a "%d" format specifier and a pointer parameter is undefined behavior. Incrementing pointers, even NULL ones, is certainly defined behavior. –  WhozCraig Nov 7 '12 at 4:04
    
It means the address in pointers p and ch is now 4 and 1 preceded by zero as following the rules of how address's are stored in my machine. Pl correct me if I am wrong. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 7 '12 at 4:06
    
@tapasweni change the %d formats in your printf() format string to %p and it will be defined behavior. You're not printing integers (or chars); you're printing addresses (i.e. pointer values). –  WhozCraig Nov 7 '12 at 4:07
    
Thanks for your explanation. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 7 '12 at 4:13

1.Why is this not giving any garbage value for p and ch as both are pointers and has not assigned any address;

err, you assigned address here > int *p = 0 and char *ch = 0. p contains address 0x00000000 and ch contains the address 0x00000000

2.Why is this giving me the address difference that the respective pointer has obtained while incrementing, or is this a undefined behavior.

char *ch = 0; means that ch contains the address 0. Incrementing the address using ++ will increment the value by sizeof(char) viz 1. Similarly for integer. p contains the address 0. And using the ++ operator increments the value by sizeof(int) which seems to be 4 on your machine(note, this isn't always true, especially for 64 bit machine).

3.Why this output is 4 1 ? here

Because at first, p contained 0, then incremented by sizeof(type_of(p)) = sizeof(int) = 4 on your machine and ch incremented by sizeof(type_of(ch)) = sizeof(char) = 1.

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As per my knowledge, I have added the answers to your questions inline:

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int x=0,*p=0;
    char c = 'A', *ch=0;
    x++; 

    // You have initialized this to 0, so incrementing adds 4 (int pointer)
    // Remember, the address '4' means nothing here
    p++; 

    // You have initialized this to 0, so incrementing adds 1 (char pointer)
    // Remember, the address '1' means nothing here
    ch++;

    // You are now printing the values of the pointers itself
    // This does not make any sense. If you are using pointers, you would want to know what is being referenced
    printf ("%d , %d  and %d\n",x,p,ch); 

    // This will FAIL
    // Because, you are now trying to print the data pointed by the pointers
    // Note the use of '*'. This is called de-referencing
    printf ("%d , %d  and %d\n", x, *p, *ch); 

    // Let p point to x, de-referencing will now work
    p = &x;
    printf ("%d , %d\n", x, *p); // 1, 1

    // Let ch point to c, de-referencing will now work
    ch = &c;
    printf ("%c , %c\n", c, *ch); // 'A', 'A'

    return 0;
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Pl. explain why is it printing 4 1. I know I am not derefrencing the pointer. And can you Pl tell in the line p = &x; printf ("%d , %d\n", x, *p); // 4, 4 why 4,4 –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 7 '12 at 3:51
1  
Because 0 + 4 = 4 and 0 + 1 = 1, and because the value of a Type * incremented by 1 increments the byte address that the pointer references by sizeof(Type) (1 unit of the size of the type, so after the increment, it points to the next value of the type). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 7 '12 at 3:52
1  
I don't think it will print 4,4 it will print 1,1.as x=1 after increment and p has the address of x and *p will be 1. Pl. correct me if I am wrong. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 7 '12 at 3:56
    
Yes, you are right. It will print 1, 1. I'll fix my answer. –  Vaibhav Desai Nov 7 '12 at 4:12

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