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I'm writing a cube root function in Google Go using Newton's method. I want to check the results using math/cmplx.Pow(), but for the life of me, I can't figure out how. How do I do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Have you tried myCubicRootOfx = Pow(x, 1.0/3) ?

edited: thanks to Jason McCreary comment:
We cannot use 1/3 as the 2nd parameter to Pow as this is a integer division and hence doesn't produce the expected 1/3 value. By using 1.0/3' or1/3.0` etc. we effectively produce a float with the 0.333333... value.

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Doesn't get much simpler than that! +1 –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 6 '13 at 3:06
2  
Needs to be 1.0/3.0 to prevent integer division. –  Jason McCreary Aug 28 '13 at 16:09
    
This is the right answer unless you are in a hurry. If you need to call this millions of times per frame or second, then pow() can be slow. Compare the speed of sqrt(x) vs pow(x,1/2.0). If you know the argument range, and also know what accuracy you need, you can do better than pow() –  Tom Andersen Nov 10 '13 at 13:54

For example,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/cmplx"
)

func main() {
    var x complex128
    x = -8
    y := cmplx.Pow(x, 1.0/3.0)
    fmt.Println(y)
    x = -27i
    y = cmplx.Pow(x, 1.0/3.0)
    fmt.Println(y)
    x = -8 - 27i
    y = cmplx.Pow(x, 1.0/3.0)
    fmt.Println(y)
    x = complex(-8, -27)
    y = cmplx.Pow(x, 1.0/3.0)
    fmt.Println(y)
}

Output:

(1+1.732050807568877i)
(2.5980762113533156-1.4999999999999996i)
(2.4767967587776756-1.7667767800295509i)
(2.4767967587776756-1.7667767800295509i)

The Go Programming Language Specification

Package cmplx

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As you're using Newton's method, I suppose you're starting with a positive real number.

So you don't need complex numbers.

You may simply do

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math"
)

func main() {
    x := 100.0
    root := math.Pow(x, 1.0/3.0)
    fmt.Println(root)
}
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I wrote the cube root function using Newton's method as part of the Go Tour Exercise 47. Perhaps the two functions below (Cbrt1 and Cbrt) are helpful.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math/cmplx"
)

// Newton's method cube root function that hopes for
//   convergence within 20 iterations
func Cbrt1(x complex128) complex128 {
    var z complex128 = x
    for i:= 0; i < 20; i++ {
        z = z - ((z*z*z - x) / (3.0*z*z))
    }
    return z
}

// Newton's method cube root function that runs until stable
func Cbrt(x complex128) complex128 {
    var z, z0 complex128 = x, x
    for {
        z = z - ((z*z*z - x) / (3.0*z*z))
        if cmplx.Abs(z - z0) < 1e-10 {
            break
        }
        z0 = z
    }
    return z
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Cbrt(2.0) , "should match" , cmplx.Pow(2, 1.0/3.0))
}
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try something like this

package main

import(
        "fmt"
        "math/cmplx"
    )


func Cbrt(x complex128) complex128 {
    z := complex128(1)


    for i:=0;i<100;i++ {  // OR JUST for{ since you will outrun complex128 in worth case
      last_z := z

      z = z - ((z*z*z - x)/(3 *z*z))    
      if last_z == z{
        return z
      }
    }
    return z
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println("good enough", Cbrt(9))
    fmt.Println("builtin", cmplx.Pow(9, 1.0/3.0))
}
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Whenever I read an answer with “try (something like) this” and throws out a bunch of code I have to ask (myself) “why?”. Please provide some information what your code does, what it accomplishes, and what the “something like” variance points to. –  Kissaki Nov 9 '13 at 13:03
    
its called Newton's method. You can read source can you? –  Andrew Yasinsky Jan 10 at 17:40

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