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I'm trying to setup a Pivotal Tracker project for a school project, and my understanding of "stories" is that they really just represent things that the user will want to do with the application.

For something that is a simple tracking tool where the user can add employees, view employee records, delete employees, etc., where would the initial design fit in with a Pivotal Tracker project? For example, if I have a story like:

"As a user, I want to be able to add a new employee to the database."

...how would I add some story to the project where I am creating the employee class, my data access layer, etc? Sort of the groundwork and class design of things that are going to be needed for all of the stories?

Thanks in advance, hopefully this is the right place for a question like this.

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...how would I add some story to the project where I am creating the employee class, my data access layer, etc? Sort of the groundwork and class design of things that are going to be needed for all of the stories?

"Creating the employee class" is not a story since it gives no business value to the user. Things like writing classes, functions, database schemes are tasks that are created when a story is selected for the next sprint. You should only create tasks and only write code that is needed for the current set of stories. Don't do "sort of groundwork" and "things that are needed for all stories" (YAGNI). You don't know what all the stories are!

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User Stories describe functionality useful to people (or personas) that will use the application.

The work involved in delivering the story should "slice" through the architecture. So if your story is "As an employee I can create new user records in the database" the work involved should handle all of the database, data access, security and UI required.

So when it is "done" that feature is potentially shippable.

How does this fit in with design? Having a lot of stories for a large project doesn't make it particularly easy to see the overall design for the solution. Epic records might help, I still prefer to have a short design iteration (Sprint Zero) to build a just good enough design to work from.

Would recommend reading "Disciplined Agile Delivery" which talks nicely about Agile design and modelling.

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