Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Dart supports both named optional parameters and positional optional parameters. What are the differences between the two?

Also, how can you tell if an optional parameter was actually specified?

share|improve this question
    
Seth's answer was totally awesome! Please be sure to green checkmark it! –  Shannon -jj Behrens Nov 8 '12 at 0:42
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Dart has two types of optional parameters: named and positional. Before I discuss the differences, let me first discuss the similarities.

Dart's optional parameters are optional in that the caller isn't required to specify a value for the parameter when calling the function.

Optional parameters can only be declared after any required parameters.

Optional parameters can have a default value, which is used when a caller does not specify a value.

Positional optional parameters

A parameter wrapped by [ ] is a positional optional parameter. Here is an example:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, [int port=80]) {
  // ...
}

In the above code, port is optional and has a default value of 80.

You can call getHttpUrl with or without the third parameter.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080); // port == 8080
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');       // port == 80

You can specify multiple positional parameters for a function:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, [int port=80, int numRetries=3]) {
  // ...
}

The optional parameters are positional in that you can't omit port if you want to specify numRetries.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', 8080, 5);

Of course, unless you know what 8080 and 5 are, it's hard to tell what those apparently magic numbers are. You can use named optional parameters to create more readable APIs.

Named optional parameters

A parameter wrapped by { } is a named optional parameter. Here is an example:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, {int port: 80}) {
  // ...
}

You can call getHttpUrl with or without the third parameter. You must use the parameter name when calling the function.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080); // port == 8080
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');             // port == 80

You can specify multiple named parameters for a function:

getHttpUrl(String server, String path, {int port: 80, int numRetries: 3}) {
  // ...
}

Because named parameters are referenced by name, they can be used in an order different from their declaration.

getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html');
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', port: 8080, numRetries: 5);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', numRetries: 5, port: 8080);
getHttpUrl('example.com', '/index.html', numRetries: 5);

I believe named parameters make for easier-to-understand call sites, especially when there are boolean flags or out-of-context numbers.

Checking if optional parameter was provided

You can detect if an optional parameter was provided with ?, which returns true if the parameter was provided (even if it was set to null!)

beAwesome([int scale]) {
  if (!?scale) {
    print('scale not specified');
  } else if (scale == null) {
    print('no awesome');
  } else {
    print('Awesome times $scale');
  }
}

beAwesome(10000);  // Awesome times 10000
beAwesome(null);   // no awesome
beAwesome();       // scale not specified

Note: You may use positional optional parameters or named optional parameters, but not both in the same function or method. The following is not allowed.

thisFunctionWontWork(String foo, [String positonal], {String named}) {
  // will not work!
}
share|improve this answer
    
For named optional parameters, you say "The optional parameters are positional in that you can't omit port if you want to specify numRetries." In my tests, I haven't seen such behaviour ; I can specify only numRetries without error. –  Alexandre Ardhuin Nov 7 '12 at 6:59
    
@AlexandreArdhuin ack, sorry, cut and paste error. fixed, thanks! –  Seth Ladd Nov 7 '12 at 8:43
1  
? operator has been deprecated. I've found only scale==null condition in dart tutorial. (expr1 ? expr2 : expr3 still works) –  Zdeněk Mlčoch Nov 29 '13 at 23:46
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.