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So I'm at a complete loss...

In my code I've got

void Parser(FILE* file)
{
    Parser par(file);
    par.Parse();
}

and I call it in my main function with Parser(file); and the header file I've got (which I included in the main file) looks like:

class Parser: public Lexer
{
public:
    Parser(FILE* file):Lexer(file);
    int Parse();
};

and the error I'm getting is:

p02.cpp: In function 'void Parser(FILE*)':
p02.cpp:20: error: expected ';' before 'par'
p02.cpp:21: error: 'par' was not declared in this scope
make: *** [p02.o] Error 1

What I don't understand is why it is expecting a semicolon before par. Isn't that a legal declaration of a variable for that class?

Edit2: Changing my function name to not be Parser like the class name does not solve this problem. It does give me an extra error telling me that Parser is not declared in this scope, but I cannot see how that is when I've added the include file containing the Parser class right above the declaration for the function.

Edit: My Files p02.cpp:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

#include "p02lex.h"
#include "y.tab.h"

using namespace std;

void Parser(FILE* file)
{
    Parser par(file);
    par.Parse();
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    char fileName[255];

    switch(argc)
    {
            case 1:
                    cout << "Enter the input file name. ";
                    cin >> fileName;
                    break;
            case 2:
                    strcpy(fileName, argv[1]);
                    break;
            default:
                    cout << "Too many arguments!\n";
                    exit(1);
    }

    FILE* file = fopen(fileName, "r");
    Parser(file);
    fclose(file);

    return 0;
}

p02lex.l:

#include "p02lex.h"

#define ID              257
...
#define PROGRAM         304

int TokenMgr(int t);
const char* getTokens(int tokenCode);

unsigned lineCount = 1, columnCount = 1;
%}

LETTER [a-z]|[A-Z]
DIGIT [0-9]

%%
// rules defined here, calling TokenMgr()
%%
int TokenMgr(int t)
{
/*      int tc = t;
    if (t == IDENTIFIER)
    {
            char s[1024];
            ToLower(s, yytext, strlen(yytext));
            tc = RW[s];
            if (tc == 0)
                    tc = t;
    }

    PrintToken(tfs, tc, line, col);
    col += yyleng; */ //JEG

    printf("Token:Code=%d Name=%10s line=%3u col=%3u Spelling=\"%s\"\n", t, getTokens(t), lineCount, columnCount, yytext);

    columnCount += yyleng;

    return /* tc */ 0; // JEG
}

Lexer::Lexer(FILE* file)
{
    yyin = file;
}

int Lexer::Scan(void)
{
    return yylex();
}

const char* getTokens(int tokenCode)
{
    switch(tokenCode)
    {
            case ID:
                    return "ID";
            ... // more cases, returning strings
            default:
                    return NULL;
    }
 }

p02lex.h:

#ifndef p02lex_h
#define p02lex_h 1
#endif

int yylex(void);

class Lexer
{
public:
    Lexer(FILE* file);

    int Scan(void);
};

p02par.h:

#ifndef p02par_h
#define p02par_h 1
#endif

using namespace std;

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C"
#endif

int yyparse(void);

class Parser: public Lexer
{
public:
    Parser(FILE* file):Lexer(file){}

    void Parse();

    // int Scan(void);
};

p02par.y:

#include <stdio.h>

#include "p02lex.h"
#include "p02par.h"

void yyerror(const char* m);
%}

%token PROGRAM
%token ID
%token SEMICOLON

%%
program:
    PROGRAM ID SEMICOLON
    { printf("Stuff happens!\n"); }

%%
void yyerror(const char* m)
{
    printf("%s\n", m);
}

/*Parser::Parser(FILE* file):Lexer(file)
{
}*/

int Parser::Parse()
{
    return yyparse();
}

p02make:

#LEX = flex
#YACC = yacc -d

CC = g++
OBJ = p02.o p02par.o p02lex.o

p02:    ${OBJ}
    $(CC) -o p02 ${OBJ} -ll -ly

y.tab.h p02par.cpp:     p02par.y
    yacc -d -v p02par.y
    mv y.tab.c p02par.cpp

p02lex.cpp:     p02lex.l
    lex p02lex.l
    mv lex.yy.c p02lex.cpp

p02par.o:       p02par.cpp p02par.h
    $(CC) -c -g p02par.cpp

p02.o:  p02.cpp p02lex.h p02par.h
    $(CC) -c -g p02.cpp

p02lex.o:       p02lex.cpp p02lex.h y.tab.h
    $(CC) -c -g p02lex.cpp
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, SingerOfTheFall, fancyPants, djechlin, Denys Séguret Nov 8 '12 at 18:37

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Don't give functions and classes the same identifier, it will only confuse you. – Ben Voigt Nov 7 '12 at 6:57

that should be :

Parser(File* file):Lexer(file) {}

Wait I checked that code, rename the function: void Parser(FILE *f) to something else.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated my code to do that. Same error. – James Nov 7 '12 at 6:55

You can only include an initializer list in a constructor definition, not a constructor declaration, so it must be followed by a function body (often empty), not a semicolon. There's also a bit of a problem with a name conflict:

void Parser(FILE* file) // here you've defined Parser as the name of a function
{
    Parser par(file); // but here you're trying to use it as the name of a class.
    par.Parse();
}

Edit: Here's a bit of code that compiles cleanly, at least with the compilers I have handy:

#include <stdio.h>

class Lexer {
    FILE *infile;
public:
    Lexer(FILE *f) : infile(f) {}
};

class Parser : public Lexer {
public:
    Parser(FILE *f) : Lexer(f) {}
    void Parse() {}
};

void do_parse(FILE *file) {
    Parser p(file);
    p.Parse();
}
share|improve this answer
    
When I change void Parser... to void myParser... and then try to run it I'm given: 'Parser' was not declared in this scope and then the original error message. – James Nov 7 '12 at 6:59
    
@James: I've added some code that compiles cleanly, as a guideline of what works. – Jerry Coffin Nov 7 '12 at 7:04
    
I tried this out and it started messing up my lexer too much. I think I'm going to go ahead an add all the code from all my files into my original question. I warn you, however, its not pretty. – James Nov 7 '12 at 7:12

You need to qualify Parser because the function has the same identifier as the class:

void Parser(FILE* file)
{
    class Parser par(file);
    par.Parse();
}

You could also rename the function.

You also need braces here:

Parser(FILE* file):Lexer(file) {}
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch on the naming conflict. The better solution is of course to rename one. – Ben Voigt Nov 7 '12 at 6:58
    
Ok, so when I follow this it removes the errors I'm given and instead gives me p02.cpp:20: error: variable 'Parser par' has initializer but incomplete type – James Nov 7 '12 at 7:02
    
@James Is the file that contains the Parser class included before the function declaration? If not, do so. – Pubby Nov 7 '12 at 7:02
    
Yes, I do #include "y.tab.h" about 4 lines above. – James Nov 7 '12 at 7:05

Change

void Parser(FILE* file)

to

Parser::Parser(FILE* file)

Constructors do not have a return type.

share|improve this answer
    
Removing the void from in front gives a new error: p02.cpp:18: error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of 'Parser' with no type Then the original error remains after that one. – James Nov 7 '12 at 6:56
    
It isn't a constructor, that would be Parser::Parser. – Ben Voigt Nov 7 '12 at 6:59
    
From the function prototype, it seemed like he was trying to write the constructor. But, you are right, I missed the scope resolution operator in my answer. – Vaibhav Desai Nov 7 '12 at 7:08

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