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I am getting the following compiler error:

/usr/include/boost/variant/variant.hpp:832:32: error: no match for call to ‘(const StartsWith) (bool&)’

for the following code. Does anybody know why?

#include "boost/variant/variant.hpp"
#include "boost/variant/apply_visitor.hpp"

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;

typedef variant<bool, int, string, const char*> MyVariant;

class StartsWith
    : public boost::static_visitor<bool>
{
public:
    string mPrefix;
    bool operator()(string &other) const
    {
        return other.compare(0, mPrefix.length(), mPrefix);
    }
    StartsWith(string const& prefix):mPrefix(prefix){}
};

int main(int argc, char **argv) 
{
    MyVariant s1 = "hello world!";
    apply_visitor(StartsWith("hel"), s1); // << compiler error
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to provide operators for every type declared in MyVariant.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, and that exactly the advantage of static_visitor, key idea of type-safety. – Eugene Mamin Nov 7 '12 at 7:51
    
I got it fixed. thank you! Since the StartsWith visitor is meant to only compare two strings, and for other types I have to return false, do you think there is any way to only have a one single functor for other types which returns false? Maybe by using a template? – Meysam Nov 7 '12 at 7:51
    
Yes you can read about template method boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/doc/html/variant/tutorial.html – Denis Ermolin Nov 7 '12 at 7:57
    
I have read it. I just don't know how to have two operators, one for type string, and one for other types. – Meysam Nov 7 '12 at 8:05

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