Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok lets say I have two classes with the same method(sampleMethod) which is overridden by the child: ObjectParent and ObjectChild

ObjectChild ExampleVariable = new ObjectChild();
(ExampleVariable as ObjectParent).sampleMethod();

Will this call the sampleMethod from ObjectChild or from ObjectParent??

I think it will call the sampleMethod from ObjectChild, but I want to make sure before I throw down a bunch of code based on that assumption.

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't Pressing F11 in visual studio while debugging, will show the actual flow of process ? (just asking I am new) –  Mr_Green Nov 7 '12 at 7:50
    
@Mr_Green Yes it does. If he pressed F11 on the second line, the debugger would jump into the child class method. –  Botz3000 Nov 7 '12 at 7:53
    
@Botz3000 Thank you for clarifying my doubt. –  Mr_Green Nov 7 '12 at 7:54
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Will this call the sampleMethod from ObjectChild or from ObjectParent?

Assuming it's really a virtual method which is properly overridden (rather than just being hidden), it will call the ObjectChild implementation. That's the whole point of virtual methods - that you don't need to know the execution-time type at compile-time. For example, I can write a method using Stream.Read (e.g. by taking the Stream as a parameter) without knowing which implementation of Stream it will end up using. At execution time that code could end up reading from the network, from memory, from disk... my method's code neither knows nor case.

Short but complete program demonstrating this:

using System;

class ObjectParent
{
    public virtual void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ObjectParent.Foo");
    }
}

class ObjectChild : ObjectParent
{
    public override void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ObjectChild.Foo");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // Simpler code to demonstrate the point
        ObjectParent parent = new ObjectChild();
        parent.Foo(); // Prints ObjectChild.Foo
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If it's overridden (as opposed to hidden), then at runtime the implementation of the child class will be used. That's one of the main points of polymorphism. You don't need to know what the actual runtime type of your object is and can treat it as an instance of the base class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes it calls ObjectChild.sampleMethod() as you can easily test against:

class ObjectParent
{
    public virtual void sampleMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Parent");
    }
}

class ObjectChild : ObjectParent
{
    public override void sampleMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Child");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are missing certain keywords.. this isn't Java ;) –  Lews Therin Nov 7 '12 at 7:52
    
Wouldn't this hide the method and in fact actually call the parent method? Assuming you had the inheritance in the object definition that is. –  thirsty93 Nov 7 '12 at 7:55
    
@LewsTherin Fine now? :) –  mmdemirbas Nov 7 '12 at 7:56
    
Now it is right. –  thirsty93 Nov 7 '12 at 7:56
add comment

It depends if your sampleMethod is virtual and overriden.. then yes. But might as well have:

ObjectParent ExampleVariable = new ObjectChild();
ExampleVariable.sampleMethod();

virtual means this method is polymorphic and can be overridden by derived types. overridden means the derived class actually overrides the implementation of sampleMethod in this case from the base class. I guess the answers are in the keywords themselves.

share|improve this answer
    
This was harder to understand than the other answers because of the grammar but reflects what I thought and agrees with the other solutions. Thanks. –  thirsty93 Nov 7 '12 at 7:54
add comment

As Jon Skeet said...."Assuming it's really a virtual method which is properly overridden (rather than just being hidden), it will call the ObjectChild implementation."

Here it is assumed that you have used virtual keyword before method in parent class and override keyword before method in child class.

Otherwise...there are two things to be considered:

  1. whether the method of parent class is just being hidden. To investigate such cases..Please have a look on following links: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173153.aspx and http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6fawty39.aspx

  2. Level of access provided to methods (Sometime it may differ in parent and child). Both the override method and the virtual method must have the same access level modifier, but if you have not used those you have choices.

Only after above considerations we can get the conclusion on the situation.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.