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If I use a FOR UPDATE clause in a stored procedure when should I "commit"? After closing the opened cursor or before closing the opened cursor? Below is the procedure im using, am i doing it in correct way?

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE Proc_UpdateCSClientCount(inMerid     IN  VARCHAR2,
                                                     outCliCount  OUT NUMBER,
                                                     outretvalue  OUT NUMBER)
AS
   CURSOR c1 IS
      SELECT CLIENT_COUNT
        FROM OP_TMER_CONF_PARENT
       WHERE MER_ID = inMerid
      FOR UPDATE OF CLIENT_COUNT;
BEGIN
   OPEN c1;
   IF SQL%ROWCOUNT = 1 THEN
      FETCH c1 INTO outCliCount;
      outCliCount := outCliCount + 1;
      UPDATE OP_TMER_CONF_PARENT
         SET CLIENT_COUNT = outCliCount
       WHERE CURRENT OF c1;
   END IF;
   outretvalue := 0;
   CLOSE c1;
   COMMIT;
EXCEPTION
   WHEN no_data_found THEN
      outretvalue := -1;
END;
share|improve this question
    
This seems like a lot of code for a small task. Can you not just run an update, returning the new client_count into a variable? Less code, fewer bugs, faster performance. – David Aldridge Nov 7 '12 at 12:31

You should commit at the end of the transaction. I doubt you can find a reasonable case where the end of the transaction is in the middle of a FOR UPDATE loop.

Perhaps you have heard that committing frequently is a good thing. This is a false myth, this is totally wrong. The opposite is true in Oracle: committing involves extra work and therefore you should only commit when all the work is done, never before.

Furthermore, from a logical point of view, it is unimaginably easier to recover from an error if you can start from scratch instead of having half the work done.

IMO, committing in a procedure should be excessively rare. The calling application should be the one that makes the necessary checks and finally decides if the data should be committed or not.

In conclusion, you can't commit accross a FOR UPDATE loop (it will produce an ORA-01002: fetch out of sequence) and that is a good thing. Whenever you find yourself committing accross a normal loop, you should ask yourself if the commit is really necessary -- most likely it isn't.

If you really need to commit and only fetch once, it doesn't matter if you commit before or after closing the cursor.


Update following your code excerpt: there are many things that need correcting in your code (I suppose it is not directly production code but still):

  • The exception will never be raised: only implicit SELECT INTO can produce NO_DATA_FOUND.
  • SQL%ROWCOUNT is NULL if the preceding statement is a SELECT.
  • You could use c1%ROWCOUNT, but this will only return the number of rows fetched: 0 after the initial open.
  • I mainly use FOR UPDATE NOWAIT so that two sessions never block each other. If you only use FOR UPDATE, you might as well use a single UPDATE and not use SELECT beforehand.
  • This is a matter of preference, but return codes are prone to errors and exceptions are generally preferred. Let the error propagate. Why would anyone call this function on an id that doesn't exist? This is probably a bug in the calling app/procedure so you should not catch it.

So you could rewrite your procedure like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE Proc_UpdateCSClientCount(inMerid     IN  VARCHAR2, 
                                                     outCliCount OUT NUMBER) AS
BEGIN
   -- lock the row, an exception will be raised if this row is locked
   SELECT CLIENT_COUNT + 1
     INTO outCliCount
     FROM OP_TMER_CONF_PARENT
    WHERE MER_ID = inMerid
   FOR UPDATE OF CLIENT_COUNT NOWAIT;
   -- update the row
   UPDATE OP_TMER_CONF_PARENT
      SET CLIENT_COUNT = CLIENT_COUNT + 1
    WHERE MER_ID = inMerid;
END;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for commenting the committing frequently issue. – Florin Ghita Nov 7 '12 at 9:43
    
+1, good explaination – Gaurav Soni Nov 7 '12 at 9:57
    
Hi vincent, 1.If i use NO WAIT other sessions cant fetch the same row it will throw the error, but i need other sessions to fetch(SELECT) but not update the same row at same time. 2.Is it possible to use FOR UPDATE clause w/o using cursors? 3.And while fetching itself u r incrementing the client count, if the Mer_id is not there, what will happen? – user1 Nov 8 '12 at 5:10
    
4.If i use c1%ROWCOUNT after FETCH c1 INTO will it return the no. of rows affected? – user1 Nov 8 '12 at 5:16
1  
1) In Oracle, locks never block readers. 2) You have to close explicit cursors, not implicit ones. 3) It will raise NO_DATA_FOUND, that is good, the calling app can handle it if it is not an error. 4) Don't use fetch with implicit cursors. If you use an explicit cursor that you fetch, use c1%ROWCOUNT after having fetched it. – Vincent Malgrat Nov 8 '12 at 9:08

From Oracle Documentation:

All rows are locked when you open the cursor, not as they are fetched. The rows are unlocked when you commit or roll back the transaction. Since the rows are no longer locked, you cannot fetch from a FOR UPDATE cursor after a commit.

That's important. If you've done the task(finished fetch) is not important if you commit before or after closing the cursor.

But if commit between fetchs is needed, as a workaround, use update with rowid, not where current of. Example from doc:

DECLARE
   CURSOR c1 IS SELECT last_name, job_id, rowid FROM employees;
   my_lastname   employees.last_name%TYPE;
   my_jobid      employees.job_id%TYPE;
   my_rowid      UROWID;
BEGIN
   OPEN c1;
   LOOP
      FETCH c1 INTO my_lastname, my_jobid, my_rowid;
      EXIT WHEN c1%NOTFOUND;
      UPDATE employees SET salary = salary * 1.02 WHERE rowid = my_rowid;
      -- this mimics WHERE CURRENT OF c1
      COMMIT;
   END LOOP;
   CLOSE c1;
END;
/

UPDATE(after edit of question): You can do that in a single sql, without cursor.

UPDATE OP_TMER_CONF_PARENT 
set CLIENT_COUNT = CLIENT_COUNT +1 
where MER_ID = inMerid;

UPDATE2. The code should be updated as following in order to work:

...
open C1;
FETCH C1 into OUTCLICOUNT;
--dbms_output.put_line(' count:'||c1%rowcount);
IF c1%rowcount = 1 THEN
      outCliCount := outCliCount + 1;
...

That is: fetch should be done before counting the rows affected, and rows affected is c1%rowcount, not sql%rowcount. If you want to know if a row is updated or not, you should put an else to if and assign a special value to the outretvalue parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
:Fetching across commit can potentially cause dreaded ORA-1555 error – Gaurav Soni Nov 7 '12 at 8:50
    
yes, but it's not the case here. In for update cursors you cannot fetch between commits. – Florin Ghita Nov 7 '12 at 8:53
    
Yes,that is clear to me ,but the solution you have provided can cause ORA-1555 problem ,may be there is some other work around to achieve this say GTT table . – Gaurav Soni Nov 7 '12 at 8:56
    
Oh, I see, I just gave a solution from docs. But the user even didn't ask for commits between fetch. He wants only to know wich is first close or commit :). So I think we should not go deeper into fetch problem :) – Florin Ghita Nov 7 '12 at 9:02
    
:Ok no problem , i was just thinking of its cons :) – Gaurav Soni Nov 7 '12 at 9:04

If you commit before closing cursor and after that you try to fetch again, you get an INVALID_CURSOR exception. I suggest to commit after closing cursor.

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