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I just want to bind one collection to another one: Lets say there is a

List<string> original = new List<string>();

and there is a

List<string> extended = 
           new List<string>(from curItem in originals select curItem + "_extension");

So the items of the extended are just the same than the original's but with an "_extension" at the end.

What I want is to bind the extended to the original, so that if the original becomes changed, the extended also changes.

I know I could use events and recreate the extended every time. But I think this is not efficient.

Edit: Lets say: original is large and it is too exhausting to recreate the single elements of the extended and its also exhausting to create a single element at all. So I want to have two lists (or collections) where on observes the other one and adds or removes the changes, like the data binding in Wpf, but adding an extension.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the BindingList<T> class on System.ComponentModel to achieve this... maybe it's like killing a fly with a hammer, but will serve to more complex examples.

I think you can make an extension method like this:

static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> Extensions(this IEnumerable<string> strs)
    {
        foreach (var str in strs)
        {
            yield return str + "_extension";
        }
    }
}

And you can use this on every IEnumerable<String>:

foreach (var x in original.Extensions())
{
    Console.WriteLine(x);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The BindingList<T> might be something I am looking for: it provides methods to report changes. But I still need to create my own extension of a List class for the extended, which can deal with the changes. Isn't there anything which is already implemented for that? –  clx Nov 7 '12 at 9:41
    
Take a look then, check this: codeproject.com/Articles/23222/BindingList-Example –  Tom Sarduy Nov 7 '12 at 9:46
1  
Thanks, but maybe I will use the ObservableCollection<T>. On the other hand, I need no extend the List class of the extended, because I need a method which deals with the changed stuff... –  clx Nov 7 '12 at 10:09

I think there are two different approaches:

  1. To change extended when original changes.
  2. Not to create extended at all, but create some class, that will add "_extention" on every query.

With bindingList the fisrt approach will be efficient enough.

public class MyClass
{
    private BindingList<string> original = new BindingList<string>();
    private List<string> extended = new List<string>();

    public BindingList<string> Original
    {
        get
        {
            return original;
        }
    }

    public IEnumerable<string> Extended
    {
        get
        {
            return extended;
        }
    }

    public MyClass()
    {
        original.ListChanged += OnChanging;
    }

    void OnChanging(object sender, ListChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        switch (e.ListChangedType)
        {
            case ListChangedType.ItemAdded:
                extended.Add(original[e.NewIndex] + "_extention");
                break;
            case ListChangedType.ItemChanged:
                extended[e.NewIndex] = original[e.NewIndex] + "_extention";
                break;
            case ListChangedType.ItemDeleted:
                extended.RemoveAt(e.NewIndex);
                break;
            case ListChangedType.ItemMoved:
                string tmp = extended[e.NewIndex];
                extended[e.NewIndex] = extended[e.OldIndex];
                extended[e.OldIndex] = tmp;
                break;
            case ListChangedType.Reset:
                extended = new List<string>();
                foreach (string originalItem in original)
                {
                    extended.Add(originalItem + "_extention");
                }
                break;
        }
    }
}

The second approach will look like this: we create our own class witch contains link to originals

public class MyExtendedList : IEnumerable
{
    private List<string> original;
    public MyExtendedList(List<String> original)
    {
        this.original = original;
    }

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new ExtendedEnum(original);
    }
}

public class ExtendedEnum : IEnumerator
{
    private List<string> original;
    private int position = -1;
    public ExtendedEnum(List<String> original)
    {
        this.original = original;
    }

    public object Current
    {
        get
        {
            return CurrentString;
        }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        position++;
        return (position < original.Count);
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        position = -1;
    }

    public String CurrentString
    {
        get
        {
            try
            {
                return original[position] + "_extension";
            }
            catch (IndexOutOfRangeException)
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
check the return Current; line, I think it would be return CurrentString –  Tom Sarduy Nov 7 '12 at 9:25

Make your own class:

public class MyClass
{
   private string _Item;
   public string Item 
   { 
       get { return _Item; }
       set 
       {
           if (_Item != value)
           {
               _Item = value;
               _ItemWithExtension = _Item + "_extension";
           }
       }
   }
   private string _ItemWithExtension;
   public string ItemWithExtension
   {
      get { return _ItemWithExtension; }
   }
}

var extended = 
           new List<MyClass>(from curItem in originals select 
                            new MyClass()
                            {
                                Item = curItem
                            }
                           );
share|improve this answer
    
How changing originals impact on extended? –  Dmitry Dovgopoly Nov 7 '12 at 8:49
    
@Amiram Korach: The problem with your solution is, that the new item becomes every time recreated when it becomes accessed. But I think this is exhausting too. I want the extended to observe the originals and just to add the new items just in time. –  clx Nov 7 '12 at 8:57
    
@Amiram: What if I do extended[0].ItemWithExtension? I will get *_extension_extension –  Tom Sarduy Nov 7 '12 at 9:04
    
@DmitryDovgopoly, when you change the Item, the ItemWithExtension will be changed, but I'll improve my answer. –  Amiram Korach Nov 7 '12 at 9:21
    
@Tom, my mistake –  Amiram Korach Nov 7 '12 at 9:22

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