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In QueryableEntities method below, IEnumerable<Competition>.AsQueryable() will return IQueryable<Competition> which am not able to return because it is expecting IQueryable<T>

I can write only one method to return IQueryable<Competition> and IQueryable<Submission>

If anyone knows how to do it please let me know, thanks

public partial class WinBoutsDataContext<T> : System.Data.Linq.DataContext where T : class
{
    public IQueryable<T> QueryableEntities
    {
        get
        {
            if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Model.Competition)))
            {
                return this.ConvertToCompetitionList(
                      this.GetTable<Storage.Competition>()).AsQueryable();
            }
             else if(typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Model.Submission)))
            {
                return this.ConvertToSubmissionList(
                       this.GetTable<Storage.CompetitionEntry>()).AsQueryable();
            }
        }
    }

    public DataAccess.Model.Competition ConvertToCompetition(DataAccess.Storage.Competition comp)
    {

        DataAccess.Model.Competition modelComp = new DataAccess.Model.Competition 
        { 
            CompetitionID = comp.CompetitionID, 
            Active = comp.Active, 
            CompetitionStatusID = 
            comp.CompetitionStatusID, 
            Duration = comp.Duration, 
            EndDate = comp.EndDate, 
            Entrants = comp.Entrants, 
            Featured = comp.Featured, 
            Image = comp.Image, 
            IsOvertime = comp.IsOvertime, 
            MaxEntrants = comp.MaxEntrants, 
            Notes = comp.Notes, 
            OvertimeDuration = comp.OvertimeDuration, 
            OvertimeEnd = comp.OvertimeEnd, 
            OvertimeStart = comp.OvertimeStart, 
            ParentCompetitionID = comp.ParentCompetitionID, 
            Prize = comp.Prize, StartDate = comp.StartDate, 
            SuggestedBy = comp.SuggestedBy, 
            Summary = comp.Summary, 
            Title = comp.Title 
        };

        return modelComp;
    }

    public IEnumerable<DataAccess.Model.Competition> ConvertToCompetitionList(IEnumerable<DataAccess.Storage.Competition> compList)
    {
        List<DataAccess.Model.Competition> compModelList = new List<DataAccess.Model.Competition>();

        foreach (DataAccess.Storage.Competition comp in compList)
        {
            compModelList.Add(ConvertToCompetition(comp));
        }

        return compModelList;
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Agree with the comment on design principles by Adrian, but if you want to do it this way

public IQueryable<T> QueryableEntities
{
    get
    {
        if (typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Model.Competition)))
        {
            return this.ConvertToCompetitionList(
                  this.GetTable<Storage.Competition>()).AsQueryable() as IQueryable<T>;
        }
         else if(typeof(T).Equals(typeof(Model.Submission)))
        {
            return this.ConvertToSubmissionList(
                   this.GetTable<Storage.CompetitionEntry>()).AsQueryable() as IQueryable<T>;
        }
    }
}

will compile and run fine. Here the x as IQueryable<T> gives x cast to IQueryable<T> if it can be cast and null if it can't.

Note: this means that when you construct your generic class if it has type Model.Competition it will return IQueryable<Model.Competition>, if it has type Model.Submission it will return IQueryable<Model.Submission>, and will return null for any other type.

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Thanks a lot.....that did it!! –  Bitsian Nov 7 '12 at 11:02

It's usually best not to generalise. Lots of developers seem to spend a lot of time trying to make one property/method/class do many things, but it goes against lots of Object Oriented principles. Personally I would just use 2 properties, maybe called Competitions and the other Submissions. It'd be a lot more intention revealing than QueryableEntities.

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