Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How portable is code that uses #pragma optimize? Do most compilers support it and how complete is the support for this #pragma?

share|improve this question
2  
I can tell you that the PS3 version of gcc doesn't support this one. –  Luchian Grigore Nov 7 '12 at 10:23
1  
Can you give an example of how you would use it in otherwise portable code? I've only ever seen such pragmas used in code that's already specific to a compiler for other reasons. –  hvd Nov 7 '12 at 10:23
1  
gcc 4.4+ has #pragma GCC optimize. You can generally assume that pragmas are not portable. –  Steve Jessop Nov 7 '12 at 10:25
5  
The '#pragma' command is specified in the ANSI standard to have an arbitrary implementation-defined effect. In the GNU C preprocessor, '#pragma' first attempts to run the game 'rogue'; if that fails, it tries to run the game 'hack'; if that fails, it tries to run GNU Emacs displaying the Tower of Hanoi; if that fails, it reports a fatal error. In any case, preprocessing does not continue. -- Richard M. Stallman, The GNU C Preprocessor, version 1.34 ---- #pragma is all about compiler-defined behaviour, i.e., non-portable. –  DevSolar Nov 7 '12 at 10:27
1  
@sharptooth: Only until next code review, when he will (hopefully) be shown the error of his ways, just like the guy using #pragma once instead of proper header guards. –  DevSolar Nov 7 '12 at 10:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

#pragma is the sanctioned and portable way for compilers to add non-sanctioned and non-portable language extensions *.

Basically, you never know for sure, and at least one major C++ compiler (g++) does not support this pragma as is.


*:

From the C++ standard (N3242):

16.6 Pragma directive [cpp.pragma]

A preprocessing directive of the form

# pragma pp-tokensopt new-line

causes the implementation to behave in an implementation-defined manner. The behavior might cause translation to fail or cause the translator or the resulting program to behave in a non-conforming manner. Any pragma that is not recognized by the implementation is ignored.

From the C standard (Committee Draft — April 12, 2011):

6.10.6 Pragma directive

Semantics

A preprocessing directive of the form

# pragma pp-tokensopt new-line

where the preprocessing token STDC does not immediately follow pragma in the directive (prior to any macro replacement)174) causes the implementation to behave in an implementation-defined manner. The behavior might cause translation to fail or cause the translator or the resulting program to behave in a non-conforming manner. Any such pragma that is not recognized by the implementation is ignored.

And here's an example:

int main () {
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for (int i=0; i<16; ++i) {}
}

A big part of the C and C++ OpenMP API is implemented as #pragmas.

share|improve this answer
    
The C standard C11 6.10.6 is identical (except some special rules regarding #pragma STDC). –  Lundin Nov 7 '12 at 10:39
    
@Lundin: Edited a minute before your comment ;) –  phresnel Nov 7 '12 at 10:41
    
But I checked the actual standard and not just the draft ;) However, they are identical in this case. –  Lundin Nov 7 '12 at 10:45
    
@Lundin: Okay you win :D –  phresnel Nov 7 '12 at 10:46

Often this is not a good idea to rely on compiler flags, since each compiler has its own behaviour.

This flag should not be used as it is a compiling level spec you inject into your code.

Normally and theoretically this flag should be ignored by compilers if not used.

share|improve this answer
    
@DevSolar : exact. You're a faster typer than me ! –  Benj Nov 7 '12 at 10:28

The #pragma keyword is portable in the sense that it should always compile despite on the compiler. However, the pragmas are compiler-specific so it's probable that when changing compiler it will complain with some warnings. Some pragmas are wide used, such as these from OpenMP. In order to make the code the most portable possible, you might surround your pragmas with #ifdef/#endif that depend on the compiler you're using. For example:

#ifdef __ICC
   #pragma optimize
#endif

Compilers usually define some macros such as __ICC that make the code know which compiler is being used.

share|improve this answer

Any use of #pragma is compiler specific.

For example : GNU, Intel and IBM :

#warning "Do not use ABC, which is deprecated. Use XYZ instead."

Microsoft :

#pragma message("Do not use ABC, which is deprecated. Use XYZ instead.")

Regarding your specific question about the #pragma optimize, it is supported by gcc and microsoft, but it doesn't mean it will be in the future.

share|improve this answer
1  
Huh, where did #warning come from? That one is definitely not portable since it isn't standard C, unlike #pragma. –  Lundin Nov 7 '12 at 10:33
1  
#warning is not a #pragma though. So GCC did implement their non-portable code in a non-portable manner, d'oh. –  phresnel Nov 7 '12 at 10:34
1  
@phresnel: it's non-portable in that there's a risk that a future standard could introduce a preprocessor directive #warning with a different meaning from gcc's #warning. Not all compiler extensions are pragmas, indeed most are not. The reason to implement your extension as a pragma is if you think compilers that don't support the extension should ignore it. In this case, would you rather write GCC-specific code in which the user gets the warning, or more-portable code where you don't know whether the warning will get issued or not? Depends how important the warning is. –  Steve Jessop Nov 7 '12 at 11:06

#pragma is not portable, full stop. There was a version of gcc that used to start of a game whenever it came across that

Of the compilers we use at work, two definitely don't support #pragma optimise, and I can't answer for the others.

And even if they did, as the command line switches for optimisation are different, the chances are that the options for the pragma would be different.

share|improve this answer
1  
The token #pragma is portable. What follows is not. –  phresnel Nov 7 '12 at 10:32
    
Other compilers are not forced to support a specific #pragma, but if a compiler does not recognize one, it should be ignored. This is required by the C standard. –  Lundin Nov 7 '12 at 10:32
    
a) that makes it pretty unportable though. b) and if it recognises what comes after but it has different effects to another compiler? how portable is that? c) The compiler could recognise the pragma keyword and cause a compilation error. This is permitted behaviour. –  Tom Tanner Nov 7 '12 at 10:43
    
That all does not invalidate that the token named #pragma is portable, i.e. sanctioned. That's a funny meta discussion. I was really meaning that one token, with the meaning of preprocessing token :) –  phresnel Nov 7 '12 at 10:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.