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I need to add some more columns into my current user-define table type in SQL Server 2008

But I didn't see any table type in particular database under Tables .

Where exactly I need to check and how can I modify the design of existing user-define table type in SQL Server 2008

I'm using SQL SERVER 2008 and SSMS

Where I can find that table in SSMS ,

so that I can go and modify table type.

thanks

for previous question answer

Please can any one help to sql alter type table syntax add column ? how can I insert any new column ... as ALTER is not working.. it is disable

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5  
Programmability -> Types -> User Defined Table Types right click then "Script as drop and create" – Martin Smith Nov 7 '12 at 10:40
    
Thanks a ton.. ;) i'm new to Types that's why didn't get it... – Neo Nov 7 '12 at 10:47
    
Can any one help to sql alter type table syntax add column ? how can I insert any new column ... as ALTER is not working ? – Neo Nov 7 '12 at 12:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

User-defined types cannot be modified after they are created, because changes could invalidate data in the tables or indexes. To modify a type, you must either drop the type and then re-create it, or issue an ALTER ASSEMBLY statement by using the WITH UNCHECKED DATA clause. For more information, see ALTER ASSEMBLY (Transact-SQL).

Points to take care while using user defined table type

1.Default values are not allowed.

2.Primary key must be a persisted column.

3.Check constraint can not be done on non persisted computed columns

4.Non clustered indexes are not allowed.

5.It can't be altered. You have to drop and recreate it.

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