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I'm trying to fix an issue with a legacy database. The quote_literal function is not working for a specific database on an 8.4 install of postgres.

Here's my results on a fresh test database:

select quote_literal(42);
 quote_literal 
---------------
 '42'
(1 row)

And now the same on the target db

select quote_literal(42);
ERROR:  function quote_literal(integer) is not unique
LINE 1: select quote_literal(42);
           ^
HINT:  Could not choose a best candidate function. You might need to add explicit type casts.

AIUI, the quote_literal(anyvalue) function should handle integer values ok, and this seems to be upheld by the first test.

So I figured the quote_literal function must have been overridden in this db but no this doesn't seem to be the case. I could override it with a specific quote_literal(integer) function but I don't see why I should have to.

The question is what is could be causing the failure of this function in this specific database whilst not affecting the fresh db?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another possibility: Somebody has added implicit casts from text to your database. This was a common workaround for an intentional BC break in 8.3. See the release notes for 8.3, E.57.2. Migration to Version 8.3

Demo:

regress=# \df quote_literal
                              List of functions
   Schema   |     Name      | Result data type | Argument data types |  Type  
------------+---------------+------------------+---------------------+--------
 pg_catalog | quote_literal | text             | anyelement          | normal
 pg_catalog | quote_literal | text             | text                | normal
(2 rows)
regress=# CREATE FUNCTION pg_catalog.text(integer) RETURNS text STRICT IMMUTABLE LANGUAGE SQL AS 'SELECT textin(int4out($1));';
CREATE FUNCTION
regress=# CREATE CAST (integer AS text) WITH FUNCTION pg_catalog.text(integer) AS IMPLICIT;
CREATE CAST
regress=# SELECT quote_literal(42);
ERROR:  function quote_literal(integer) is not unique
LINE 1: SELECT quote_literal(42);
               ^
HINT:  Could not choose a best candidate function. You might need to add explicit type casts.
regress=# 

This'll fix it, but probably break other code that's still relying on the cast:

regress=# DROP CAST (integer AS text);
DROP CAST
regress=# SELECT quote_literal(42);
 quote_literal 
---------------
 '42'
(1 row)
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah good idea... Can't figure out a simple way to see if the cast has been added though. Surely this should be simple –  Ollie Edwards Nov 7 '12 at 12:24
    
@OllieEdwards \dC in psql; see \h –  Craig Ringer Nov 7 '12 at 12:37
    
Thanks, knew it would be easy. This is indeed the problem, there is an implicit cast from integer to text, as you say most likely because this is a very old DB which was most likely created <8.3. Now to figure out a solution which doesn't totally break everything else... –  Ollie Edwards Nov 7 '12 at 12:50
    
Whoops, "see \h" should've been "see \?". –  Craig Ringer Nov 8 '12 at 2:51

Somebody has probably defined another single-argument quote_literal function with an argument type that's assignment-compatible to integer, like bigint.

In psql, connect and run:

\df quote_literal

and you'll see multiple entries, like this:

regress=> \df quote_literal
                              List of functions
   Schema   |     Name      | Result data type | Argument data types |  Type  
------------+---------------+------------------+---------------------+--------
 pg_catalog | quote_literal | text             | anyelement          | normal
 pg_catalog | quote_literal | text             | text                | normal
 public     | quote_literal | text             | bigint              | normal
(3 rows)

You only want the 1st two, in pg_catalog. However, I can't advise you to just:

DROP FUNCTION public.quote_literal(bigint);

... because you might have code that expects it to exist. Time to go digging and see where it's used. Have fun.

Demo showing that this is likely the problem:

regress=> SELECT quote_literal(42);
 quote_literal 
---------------
 '42'
(1 row)

regress=> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION quote_literal(bigint) RETURNS text AS 'SELECT ''borkborkbork''::text;' LANGUAGE sql;
CREATE FUNCTION
regress=> SELECT quote_literal(42);
ERROR:  function quote_literal(integer) is not unique
LINE 1: SELECT quote_literal(42);
               ^
HINT:  Could not choose a best candidate function. You might need to add explicit type casts.
regress=> 
share|improve this answer
    
This was also my first thought, but as I said this doesn't appear to be the case. Thanks for your input though. –  Ollie Edwards Nov 7 '12 at 11:52
    
@OllieEdwards How did you determine that quote_literal had not been overridden? Tried select n.nspname, p.proname from pg_catalog.pg_proc p inner join pg_namespace n on (p.pronamespace = n.oid) where p.proname = 'quote_literal'; ? –  Craig Ringer Nov 7 '12 at 11:54

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