Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was getting the NSString from UIWebView which contain iPhone emoji and reversing text excluding emoji. I need to display reverse of NSString again in UIWebView but couldn't get the reversed string with emoji. I am not identifying the emoji character in string. I have xcode 4.5 with iOS 6.0. here is my code:

 - (NSString *) createReverseStringFromString:(NSString *)inputString {
  if (inputString.length <= 0)
    return inputString;

 NSMutableString *mutableReverseString = [[NSMutableString alloc] 
 initWithCapacity:inputString.length];
 Thfor (NSInteger i = inputString.length -1; i >= 0; i--) {

    NSString *characterString = [inputString substringWithRange:NSMakeRange(i, 1)];
    [mutableReverseString appendString:characterString];

    NSLog(@"mutableReverseString..%@",mutableReverseString);
 }

 NSString *outputString = [mutableReverseString copy];
 [mutableReverseString release];
return [outputString autorelease];
 }
share|improve this question
    
what do u mean by reversing emoji ? –  Prince Nov 7 '12 at 11:51
    
I want to reverse all chracters not emoji –  Sudha Nov 7 '12 at 11:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that many emoji characters are internally stored as a "surrogate pair" of two characters.

For example, "THUMBS UP SIGN" is Unicode point U+1F44D, but if you store it in an NSString and use substringWithRange to get single characters, you will get two characters:

U+D83D, U+DC4D

which is the UTF-16 surrogate pair for U+1F44D.

Of course, if you reverse these two characters, the output is garbage.

The solution is to use rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex to get sequences of characters which "belong together":

- (NSString *) createReverseStringFromString:(NSString *)inputString {
    if (inputString.length <= 0)
        return inputString;

    NSMutableString *mutableReverseString = [[NSMutableString alloc] 
                         initWithCapacity:inputString.length];

    NSInteger i = inputString.length;
    while (i > 0) {
        NSRange range = [inputString rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex:i-1];
        NSString *characterString = [inputString substringWithRange:range];
        [mutableReverseString appendString:characterString];
        i = range.location;
    }

    NSString *outputString = [mutableReverseString copy];
    return outputString;
}

This function correctly reverses strings containing emoji characters.

(Note: I have omitted all release, autorelease calls because I always compile with ARC. You have to add that again where appropriate.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank u its really works –  Sudha Nov 8 '12 at 8:35
    
Great explanation! It helps me a lot! The wiki link about UTF-16 and surrogate pair: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16 –  ideawu Jun 12 '13 at 4:02
    
great explanation! Note that if you use emoji chars like flags, this will not work because flags are actually four characters. –  drakos May 9 at 1:11
    
@drakos: That is interesting! I had not seen these "regional indicator symbols" and their special treatment as flags before. I would have assumed that rangeOfComposedCharacterSequenceAtIndex: takes care of that, but it doesn't. –  Martin R May 9 at 4:59
    
@drakos: On the other hand, πŸ‡©πŸ‡ͺ is two valid Unicode characters: πŸ‡© and πŸ‡ͺ, so it might be difficult to decide whether they should stick together or not. - Anyway, thanks for the feedback. I learned something new today! –  Martin R May 9 at 5:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.