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I have a doubt with a few lines of PHP.

I have the following code:

// returns TRUE if a day is festive, FALSE otherwise
$festive = isFestive();
// 
$workingDay = $d>0 && !$festive;

Is $workingDay = $d>0 && !$festive the same as writing $workingDay = $d>0 && $festive==FALSE; ?

Any help is appreciated.

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No it's not, but in a way it is. !$festive, is "not festive", so it will also match things like undefined or null, as that would be "not" aswell, while checking for "false" will only match if it is 'exactly' false; –  adeneo Nov 7 '12 at 12:02
2  
Actually, yes it is, you're thinking about "===" which will not match "false" unless $festive is EXACTLY false. –  Deleteman Nov 7 '12 at 12:04
    
@Deleteman and adeneo: thanks! –  ContentiousMaximus Nov 7 '12 at 12:08
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it is. It is different if you instead do: $festive === FALSE since in that case, values of $festive that are "falsy" will not return true, since they not exactly FALSE.

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Ok, perfect, thanks very much. –  ContentiousMaximus Nov 7 '12 at 12:07
    
Glad to help. It is also considered a good practice to accept the answer as correct if you consider that it covers your question. –  Deleteman Nov 7 '12 at 15:09
    
Ok, sorry. I vote for your answer, even if any other answer here (included comments) also was great. –  ContentiousMaximus Nov 7 '12 at 15:19
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It's all about data types and how PHP will treat different values of non-boolean types as "false". Check out the follow snippet to illustrate this:

<?php
$test = false;
$test2 = null;
$test3 = 0;
$test4 = '';
$test5 = array();

var_dump($test == false);
var_dump($test2 == false);
var_dump($test3 == false);
var_dump($test4 == false);
var_dump($test5 == false);

var_dump($test === false);
var_dump($test2 === false);
var_dump($test3 === false);
var_dump($test4 === false);
var_dump($test5 === false);

And the resulting output (formatted):

bool(true)
bool(true)
bool(true)
bool(true)
bool(true)

bool(true)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
bool(false)
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Any if() expression is evaluated to be either false or true. If expression is not explicitly Boolean, then it is converted to boolean and then evaluated. Here is how PHP converts certain types to boolean. In general, if value (numeric, non-boolean) is non zero, it is considered TRUE. See this document to find out more on how PHP evaluates expressions.

So in your case $d>0 evaluates to boolean depending on $d real value, while for !$festive the $festive is first converted to boolean and then negated (!, i.e. if $festive is numberic value 2, then it is converted to TRUE (non-zero) and then negated so the !$festive expression evaluates to FALSE.

Additional note: since your logical condition is AND (&&), if $d>0 is evaluated to false the !$festive will not be evaluated as due to Boole's algebra false && <anything> is always false.

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