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Given the following in the same script:

class ClassA:
    def GetExpBidBrice():
        global x
        x ='abc'

    def GetExpAskPrice():
        y = x + 'zyz'

class ClassB:
    def GetExpBidBrice():
        x = 123

    def GetExpAskPrice():
        y = x + 'zyz'

Does the global in ClassA.GetExpBidPrice() make x global just to the other method in ClassA? Or does it make it global right across the board i.e. in ClassB or any other class that uses a variable called x?

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Fix your code, please it is hardly readable. –  alexvassel Nov 7 '12 at 12:18
    
What have you tried? It's not a hard thing to try out and get an answer for, or to find in the documentation. –  Chris Morgan Nov 7 '12 at 12:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The variable is made global in the current code block only. From the global statement documentation:

The global statement is a declaration which holds for the entire current code block. It means that the listed identifiers are to be interpreted as globals. It would be impossible to assign to a global variable without global, although free variables may refer to globals without being declared global.

The variable x in other methods is unaffected. It'll only be a global in the ClassA.GetExpBidBrice() method.

If you wanted it to be a global in the other methods as well (ClassA.GetExpAskPrice(), ClassB.GetExpBidBrice() and ClassB.GetExpAskPrice()) then you'd need to declare x a global in each method separately.

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The use of the global keyword in a given function marks any use of the variable within that function's scope as referring to a module-level global variable with that name.

In your example, having a method with just a global declaration has no effect on the use of the same name in other methods.

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global keyword used inside function will be effective with in that function block. global will help you to make changes/update the global variable from within the function.

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I say "throughout the whole script". That means in the namespace where no identation is, right after >>>

>>> def g():
    def f():
        global x
        print x
    return f

>>> f = g()
>>> f.func_globals is g.func_globals
True
>>> f.func_globals is globals()
True
>>> x = 3
>>> f()
3

This second example tells you: it is always the module/script namespace

>>> x = 3
>>> def g():
    x = 0
    def f():
        global x
        print x
        x += 1
    return f

>>> f = g()
>>> f() # would be 0 if x of g was used.
3
>>> f()
4
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It depends.

Methods that do assignments will create local variables unless they are declared with the global keyword in the same method.

Methods that only read the variable will attempt to read a global by that name. For example:

class ClassA:
    def GetExpBidBrice(self):
        global x
        x ='abc'

class ClassB:
    def GetExpAskPrice(self):
        print(x)

a = ClassA()
b = ClassB()

a.GetExpBidBrice()
b.GetExpAskPrice()

Will display abc.

BUT: if you omit the first method call, and just do:

b = ClassB()
b.GetExpAskPrice()

you get:

NameError: global name 'x' is not defined

Now, if we change to:

def GetExpAskPrice(self):
    x = 'xyz'
    print(x)

this assignment is to a local variable called 'x', it will not affect the global.

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