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I am using MFC in Visual Studio. This is the function StartClient, defined in the cpp file, and declared in .h file as

        protected:
      bool StartClient();     // in Client.h file 

          bool CClientSocketDlg::StartClient()      //in Client.cpp file
          {
            CString strServer;
        m_ctlIPAddress.GetWindowText( strServer );
            ------
            -----
            return bSuccess; 
          }

I also declared this

          extern CClientSocketDlg StartClient();  // in global.h

I want to call the StartClient() function in someother xyz.cpp file. That's why i declared this function as global. But it doesnt work.

This give the error :

error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol "class CClientSocketDlg __cdecl StartClient(void)" (?StartClient@@YA?AVCClientSocketDlg@@XZ)

Kindly guide me to resolve that error. Thanks

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Your first code snippet doesn't make sense. Is the first line from inside the class definition in the .h file, and the rest from the method definition in the .cpp file? If so, say so. –  j_random_hacker Nov 7 '12 at 12:22
    
Your question isn't really about declaring a global function, you seem to have done that correctly. The error you get is saying that you didn't define the function correctly. To define your global function write this CClientSocketDlg StartClient() { ... } in your cpp file. Unfortunately I think the real issue is that your question is asking for something that you don't actually want. So maybe you should explain what the real problem is and ask for solutions. And post some more code, your code seems quite mixed up but without seeing real code it's hard to help with that. –  john Nov 7 '12 at 12:27
    
i added some detail in the question –  Nabeel Nov 7 '12 at 13:47
    
This is not a global function, it is a member function. –  EJP Nov 7 '12 at 22:09

2 Answers 2

The declaration

extern CClientSocketDlg StartClient();

tells the compiler that StartClient is a free-standing function that takes no arguments and returns a copy of a CClientSocketDlg object.

The definition

bool CClientSocketDlg::StartClient() { ... }

tells the compiler that the class CClientSocketDlg has a member function named StartClient that takes no arguments and returns a bool.

These two are not the same.

In case of the error, it seems that you are calling the free-standing function, not the member function, and it has only been declared not defined (i.e. there is no implementation of that function). If you mean to call the StartClient from the class you should declare an object and call the function in the object:

CClientSocketDlg dlg;
dlg.StartClient();

If you mean to call the free-standing you have to implement the function.

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that function has already been implemented. i just want to use that function in some other cpp file –  Nabeel Nov 7 '12 at 13:47
    
@Nabeel Then you don't build properly with that file. Is it included in the project? –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 7 '12 at 14:34
    
i edited the question. i hope this is all the information you need –  Nabeel Nov 7 '12 at 14:44

You Can Use Scope Resolution Operator for Accessing the Global function in C++

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