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It is possible to create a function which accepts variable number of arguments:

function f(const x: array of const): String;

and use it this way:

f([1,3,4, "hello"]);

It is also possible to define an argument as "changeable":

function g(var x: Byte): String;

var B: Byte;
g(B);

But is it possible to define a function which can take any number of arguments of whatver type and change all of their values? I know I can do this using pointers but then I don't know the type of the parameter passed so it is quite unsafe to mess with them.


I just want to create a function which can return variable number of variables of many different types, not just of 1 type or just 1 variable. And I don't want to write zillions of lines to use the function- it should just be the function itself, no SetLength() before the function call or anything. So here is the best thing I made so far:

type TVarArr = Array of Variant;
     PVarArr = ^TVarArr;
Procedure f(a: PVarArr);
var
 i:Integer;
begin
  SetLength(A^, 4);
  a^[0] := 46;
end;

ar: TVarArr;
begin
f(@ar);
caption := IntToStr(ar[0]);
share|improve this question
    
function f(var x: array of const): String; as described here: docwiki.embarcadero.com/RADStudio/XE3/en/… –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '12 at 12:47
    
@DavidHeffernan But I can't invoke it like this: f([a, b, c]) because it gives me an error: "Constant object cannot be passed as var parameter". So how do I call this function? –  Tom Nov 7 '12 at 12:55
    
OK, I was wrong. You can't do what you want. Sorry –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '12 at 12:58
    
It's not possible to do this, because the function doesn't receive anything to change. In the case of f([1, 3, 4, 'hello']), what is received is the value 1, 2, 3, and the constant string hello. That's why it's called an array of const - because it's constant (unchangeable). –  Ken White Nov 7 '12 at 13:30
2  
That's an open array. Use a dynamic array: var a: TVarArray. It's clear from your comments that you need to revise your knowledge of open arrays. –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '12 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Tom will not be able to use this answer as his Delphi version isn't high enough, but anybody on D2010 or higher will be able to put the extended rtti's TValue to good use on this type of challenge.

Following is a small console app showing how to:

  • create a dynamic array of TValue's from a open array parameter;
  • copy a dynamic array of TValue's to a new dynamic array modifying individual values on the way;
  • modify the items in a dynamic array of TValues "in place".

Enjoy.

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.Rtti,
  System.SysUtils,
  System.TypInfo;

const
  StringKinds: set of TTypeKind = [tkChar, tkString, tkWChar, tkLString, tkWString, tkUString];

type
  TValueArray = array of TValue;

function ValueArrayFromConstArray(const aSource: array of TValue): TValueArray;
var
  idx: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(Result, Length(aSource));
  for idx := Low(aSource) to High(aSource) do
    Result[idx] := aSource[idx];
end;

function ReturnNewArray(const aSource: TValueArray): TValueArray;
var
  idx: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(Result, Length(aSource));
  for idx := Low(aSource) to High(aSource) do
    if aSource[idx].Kind in StringKinds then
      Result[idx] := 'Dest' + aSource[idx].ToString
    else
      if aSource[idx].Kind in [tkInteger] then
        Result[idx] := 10 + aSource[idx].AsInteger
      else
        Result[idx] := aSource[idx];
end;

procedure ModifyArrayValues(var aArray: TValueArray);
var
  idx: Integer;
begin
  for idx := Low(aArray) to High(aArray) do
    if aArray[idx].Kind in StringKinds then
      aArray[idx] := 'Dest' + aArray[idx].ToString
    else
      if aArray[idx].Kind in [tkInteger] then
        aArray[idx] := 10 + aArray[idx].AsInteger
      else
        ;//aArray[idx] := aArray[idx];
end;

var
  Source: TValueArray;
  Destination: TValueArray;
  Item: TValue;
  idx: Integer;
begin
  Source := ValueArrayFromConstArray(['Some', 42, TObject]);
  Destination := ReturnNewArray(Source);
  idx := 0;
  WriteLn('', #9, 'Old', #9, 'New');
  WriteLn('-', #9, '----', #9, '----');
  for Item in Source do
  begin
    WriteLn(idx, #9, Item.ToString, #9, Destination[idx].ToString);
    Inc(idx);
  end;
  WriteLn;
  WriteLn;
  WriteLn('', #9, 'Modified');
  WriteLn('-', #9, '----');
  Source := ValueArrayFromConstArray(['first', 50, TValue.From<TFloatValue>(fvCurrency)]);
  ModifyArrayValues(Source);
  for Item in Source do
  begin
    WriteLn(idx, #9, Item.ToString);
  end;
  ReadLn;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
You're creating a copy of the original array and modifying that copy, not modifying the original array (which is what the question asked), AFAICT. Those appear to be two separate things. –  Ken White Nov 7 '12 at 21:30
    
@KenWhite In ReturnNewArray I am, in ModifyArrayValues I am not. –  Marjan Venema Nov 7 '12 at 21:31
    
Sure you are. You create the array with Source := ValueArrayFromConstArray (which is not the same as passing an array of const using ModifyArrayValues([varA, varB, varC]); and then pass that copy (Source) to ModifyArrayValues; that's not the same as modifying the original array. –  Ken White Nov 7 '12 at 21:35
    
@KenWhite: Oh, that's the part you are talking about. Yes, there I am creating a new array. It was just a way to get an array with items of various different types easily initialized (ie without having to do SetLength). I am sure that it could be "improved" to do some in place magic as open array's are cast compatible with dynamic ones. But why? I don't read that as a requirement in the question. I read OP somewhat cryptic question and various comments to just wanting to be able to to return an array with items of different types or modify the items in one when passed into a function. –  Marjan Venema Nov 7 '12 at 21:43
    
You can do that with an array of Variant. The question was specifically about changing the values of an array created as func([a, b, c]) where a and b are different types than c (see the first code snippet in the original question). There's a difference between an array of Variant and an array of const - which I'm sure you know :-). I don't know if you can see Tom's deleted "answer" (which was an extended comment posted as an answer) or not; I don't remember what rep is required for that off-hand, but it mentions that as well. –  Ken White Nov 7 '12 at 21:50
Procedure All(var a:Array of Variant);
var
 i:Integer;
begin
  for I := Low(a) to High(a) do
      begin

        if VarType(a[i])=258  then
          a[i] := a[i] + ' modified';

      end;
end;

Procedure AllConst( a:Array of Variant);
var
 i:Integer;
begin
  for I := Low(a) to High(a) do
      begin
        Showmessage(a[i]);
      end;
end;


procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var
 a:Array of Variant;
begin
  AllConst([1,2,'Test']);
  SetLength(a,3);
  a[0] := 3.141;
  a[1] := 'Test';
  a[2] := 27;
  all(a);
  Showmessage(a[1]);
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Problem with that is that only works with variants. –  David Heffernan Nov 7 '12 at 13:01
    
The problem with this is AllConst accepts variable number of parameters, but can't change them and All() can change parameters but accepts only 1 of them. –  Tom Nov 7 '12 at 13:04
    
@David Heffermann, that's right , never had to write my own varianttypes ... uweraabe.de/Blog/2010/08/07/a-magical-gathering-part-2 –  bummi Nov 7 '12 at 13:09
    
How about something like this: Procedure All(out a:Array of Variant); begin SetLength(A, 4); //this doesn't compile, but if it did it would be a nice solution end; –  Tom Nov 7 '12 at 13:30
1  
this will compile .... type TVariantArray=Array of Variant; {$R *.dfm} procedure All(out a:TVariantArray); begin SetLength(a,10); a[1] := 'Test'; end; procedure TForm3.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); var a:TVariantArray; begin All(a); Showmessage(a[1]); end; –  bummi Nov 7 '12 at 14:27

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