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I am working with 3 branches and I want to rebase one branch from two others at the same time.


What I got with

git log --graph --decorate --pretty=oneline --abbrev-commit

are the followings:

Branch A:

* f751d1a (A) commit2
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

Branch B:

* 3770d35 (B) commit3
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

Branch C, which I firstly rebased from A and then B:

* 9740b0e (HEAD, C) commit4
* a280f0a commit2                   //same commit name but different sha code
* 3770d35 (B) commit3
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

When I perform

git checkout C
git rebase A

I got the following:

* 2e08816 (HEAD, C) commit4
* bbc77ad commit3                   //different sha-code
* f751d1a (A) commit2
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

When I perform

git checkout C
git rebase B

I got the following:

* bf67d55 (HEAD, C) commit4
* f69ecdd commit2                   //different sha code
* 3770d35 (B) commit3
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

However, what i really need is making C branch

* 1234567 (HEAD, C) commit4
* 3770d35 (B) commit3
* f751d1a (A) commit2
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

without changing the branches A and B.

I made some research but couldn't figure how to do. Is it possible, is there way to achieve this?

In other words, how can I convert

master---A
      \
       B---C
or

master---B
      \
       A---C

to

       A
      /
master---B
      \
       A---B---C

or something like this.

Thanks in advance...

Additional question:

Thank you, (@Brian Phillips, @Useless)! After merging, it seemed work how I want. However, later, I made a commit in B and made 'fixup' with git rebase master -i with lines.

pick 3770d35 commit3
fixup 3cbf79d commit4

It becames following with git merge B:

*   5fa9192 (HEAD, C) Merge branch 'B' into C
|\  
| * 147258a (B) commit3 //changed content after fixup
* |   7768962 Merge branch 'B' into C
|\ \  
| * | 3770d35 B commit3
| |/  
* | f751d1a (A) commit2
|/  
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

Also with git rebase B, it becomes:

* 0e1355b (HEAD, C)
* 147258a (B) commit3 //changed content after fixup
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1

Is there a way to keep it like:

*  (HEAD, C) 5454215 Merge branch 'B' into C
|\ 
| * 147258a (B) commit3 //changed content after fixup
| |  
* | f751d1a (A) commit2
|/  
* 4e552f3 (master) commit1
share|improve this question
    
about your follow-up question ... did you mean to lose commit 3 from branch B? – Useless Nov 7 '12 at 15:49
    
Sorry, i made a mistake, just edited again. – Alper Nov 7 '12 at 16:02
2  
Ah, so you have two versions of commit3 (the original and the rebased version) both merged into C. Well, there is a way to get what you ask (reset --hard C to before the merge, and do it all again with the new B). However, the better solution is to never rebase commits which are already visible outside a local branch. Just apply the fix, merge it, and stop trying to cover up your mistakes - we all make them ... – Useless Nov 7 '12 at 16:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you rebase, you create a new commit with the same contents, but new metadata (ancestry etc.). So, you can't trivially use rebase to do this.

Let's look at your target state:

           2 [A]
          /
1 [master]--- 3 [B]
          \
           2 -- 3 -- 4 [c]

(I rewrote it showing your commits alongside the branch names). This is impossible, because there are two copies of commit 3 with different metadata (they have different parent commits).

However, you could do this:

           2 [A] ----
          /           \
1 [master]--- 3 [B] -- m -- 4 [C]

by creating a merge commit (m) which combines branches A and B, and then rebasing C on top of that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I've added an another question on the bottom of the original question since it didn't fit here :) Please note it :) – Alper Nov 7 '12 at 15:36

Since git's SHA1 commit IDs are created based on not only the contents of the commit but also the time and ancestry of those commits (among other things), what you are asking for is impossible. Commit ID 3770d35 can not exist as anything other than exactly where it was to begin with (short of a SHA-1 hash collision). If this topic is of interest, you may want to read more about git internals (http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Internals-Git-Objects might be good for starters).

I would encourage you to not give so much significance to commit IDs and think more about commit contents (and ordering, if that is of interest). Your first attempt you list above (git checkout C; git rebase A) seems to be semantically what you're looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but when i do git checkout C; git rebase A, in git log --graph --decorate --pretty=oneline --abbrev-commit, f751d1a (A) commit2 line refers the branch A by (A), however bbc77ad commit3 only shows the name of the commit. Then, is there a way to make the commit3 refer to branch B, i.e. bbc77ad (B) commit3. Thanks again... – Alper Nov 7 '12 at 13:48
1  
No, commits only belong to a branch by virtue of being an ancestor of the tip (HEAD) of the branch. If you want to preserve the fact that commit3 came from branch "B", you should probably use merge instead of rebase. – Brian Phillips Nov 7 '12 at 15:11
    
I merged the branches, please note my additional question on bottom, it didn't fit here :), Thanks! – Alper Nov 7 '12 at 15:34

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