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I have such a Book model:

class Book(models.Model):
    authors = models.ManyToManyField(Author, ...)
    ...

In short:

I'd like to retrieve the books whose authors are strictly equal to a given set of authors. I'm not sure if there is a single query that does it, but any suggestions will be helpful.

In long:

Here is what I tried, (that failed to run getting an AttributeError)

# A sample set of authors
target_authors = set((author_1, author_2))

# To reduce the search space, 
# first retrieve those books with just 2 authors.
candidate_books = Book.objects.annotate(c=Count('authors')).filter(c=len(target_authors))

final_books = QuerySet()
for author in target_authors:
    temp_books = candidate_books.filter(authors__in=[author])
    final_books = final_books and temp_books

... and here is what I got:

AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute '_meta'

In general, how should I query a model with the constraint that its ManyToMany field contains a set of given objects as in my case?

ps: I found some relevant SO questions but couldn't get a clear answer. Any good pointer will be helpful as well. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

You can use complex lookups with Q objects

from django.db.models import Q
...
target_authors = set((author_1, author_2))
q = Q()
for author in target_authors:
    q &= Q(authors=author)
Books.objects.annotate(c=Count('authors')).filter(c=len(target_authors)).filter(q)
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1  
Thanks @goliney, although the approach is neat and inspiring, I guess it's not doing what I'm looking for. If there is just one author, it works fine, but when there are multiple authors, the AND process is probably leading to an impossible constraint like (where a=x AND a=y). –  iuysal Nov 7 '12 at 17:25
2  
As it turned out, there is something unclear in Q() behaviour for me. According to this relative question I find on SO, Q() & Q() is not equal to .filter().filter(). Thank you for your question –  goliney Nov 7 '12 at 21:24
2  
Thanks for the link and sharing your time. –  iuysal Nov 8 '12 at 10:37
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Similar to @goliney's approach, I found a solution. However, I think the efficiency could be improved.

# A sample set of authors
target_authors = set((author_1, author_2))

# To reduce the search space, first retrieve those books with just 2 authors.
candidate_books = Book.objects.annotate(c=Count('authors')).filter(c=len(target_authors))

# In each iteration, we filter out those books which don't contain one of the 
# required authors - the instance on the iteration.
for author in target_authors:
    candidate_books = candidate_books.filter(authors=author)

final_books = candidate_books
share|improve this answer
    
Your solutions do the same. Filter kwargs are "AND"ed –  goliney Nov 7 '12 at 19:01
    
You're right, they look the same. However, I think there is an execution difference. As far as I understood, in your approach, the author in the authors field which matches author_1 is also expected to match with author_2. On the other hand, iterative filtering doesn't enforce such a constraint. If I'm wrong, please correct me. I'm here to learn. Thanks again! –  iuysal Nov 7 '12 at 20:56

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