Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following xml document (only a digest to show the structure, as it is quite long):

<document>    
<article>
            <head>ISA Savers Could Lose Tax Relief</head>
            <text>
                <paragraph>Tax relief could be withdrawn from tens of thousands of Individual Savings Account, sheltering up to £500 million from tax, because some banks and building societies are flouting not only the spirit, but the letter of the laws governing them.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>This will come as alarming news to thousands of savers who invested in fixed rate Isas which they thought would offer them security combined with a tax shelter The Inland Revenue is writing to all Britain's savings institutions reminding them of the basic Isa rules and warning that tax relief will be withdrawn if these are manipulated in anyway.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>Furthermore, the Revenue will castigate some deposit-takers for already breaching the rules and demand they speedily rewrite their terms and conditions, or face loss of tax-relief.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>The guardian of the nations coffers is known to be deeply disturbed at the rapid recent growth of fixed- rate Isas which lock savers in for several years, maintaining these are unlawful. It is sending a stark reminder to all savings institutions that customers must be allowed to withdraw their cash, and requiring those which don't, to address the violation.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>At the front of the firing line are Bradford &amp; Bingley, Liverpool Victoria, and Julian Hodge Bank, which attracted huge inflows of money because they have been consistently among the best buys. All three specifically prohibit withdrawals. The Ipswich Building Society joined them last week, becoming the latest to offer a fixed- rate Isa, outlawing withdrawals until the end of the term.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>A written statement from the Revenue said:"When ISAs were introduced Ministers made it clear that one of the their main objectives was to encourage non-savers to start saving, and people with small amounts saved, to save more. It was therefore important that ISAs would not lock in savers' money as this would exclude people with limited resources who might need access to their money quickly.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>"We do not consider that a product whose terms and conditions actually prevented withdrawals or transfers during a fixed term would be consistent with Ministers' intentions or the statutory rules."</paragraph>
                <paragraph>So serious are the Revenue's concerns that they no longer trust banks and building societies to monitor themselves. They plan to introduce a new requirement which insists institutions submit full details of all Isa accounts to them for approval, before they becomes available to the public. Until now, banks merely had to satisify themselves they were not breaking the rules.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>Paul James, marketing manager of Julian Hodge Bank, said the fixed accounts were launched in response to customer demand.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>He said:"People were asking for a fixed rate, and those who have taken them out over the past couple of years have done well. We understood that Isas had to be transferable on notice, which we took to be the end of the fixed period.</paragraph>
                <paragraph>"We were audited by the Revenue last year, and the issue was not raised at that stage, so we thought everything was OK. If we have been successfully audited then the accounts can't be otherwise but OK surely?"</paragraph>
                <paragraph>Nigel Snell, a spokesman for Liverpool Victoria said that its range of five Isas prohibiting withdrawals did include a proviso in the small print allowing access to funds "in exceptional circumstances and by permission of the trustees".</paragraph>
                <paragraph>He added:"We make it clear to people that their money is locked away, but thought the account was compliant because of this clause in the small print."</paragraph>
                <paragraph>An Ipswich spokesman said it was aware there was some ambiguity when its account was launched last week. However, it acknowledged it may have to review its terms and conditions again, after seeing the letter from the Revenue.</paragraph>
            </text>
            <date>
                <day>10</day>
                <month>05</month>
                <year>2002</year>
            </date>
            <source>Sexymoney</source>
            <portal>Finance</portal>
            <ID number="2610981009.98103"/>
        </article>
.
.
.

I have to find all nodes in each article that occur after the head node and before the portal node.

I don't know how to iterate through all the child nodes and grandchild nodes of the article node and compare it with the head node and portal node of the same article node.

Here is one of my attempts to solve the xpath query (which does obviously not work, because I don't know how to iterate through all of the nodes for comparison):

for $x in //article return $x[$x/text >> $x/head and $x/text << $x/portal]//*

Thanks in advance for your answers

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I. XPath 2.0 solution:

Use:

/*/article/*[. >> ../head and ../portal >> .]

II. XPath 1.0 solution (it is also an XPath 2.0 solution):

/*/article/head/following-sibling::*[following-sibling::portal]

III. XSLT - based verification:

This XSLT 2.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
     <xsl:sequence select="/*/article/*[. >> ../head and ../portal >> .]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<document>
    <article>
        <head>ISA Savers Could Lose Tax Relief</head>
        <text>
            <paragraph>Tax relief could be withdrawn from tens of thousands of Individual Savings Account, sheltering up to £500 million from tax, because some banks and building societies are flouting not only the spirit, but the letter of the laws governing them.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>This will come as alarming news to thousands of savers who invested in fixed rate Isas which they thought would offer them security combined with a tax shelter The Inland Revenue is writing to all Britain's savings institutions reminding them of the basic Isa rules and warning that tax relief will be withdrawn if these are manipulated in anyway.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Furthermore, the Revenue will castigate some deposit-takers for already breaching the rules and demand they speedily rewrite their terms and conditions, or face loss of tax-relief.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>The guardian of the nations coffers is known to be deeply disturbed at the rapid recent growth of fixed- rate Isas which lock savers in for several years, maintaining these are unlawful. It is sending a stark reminder to all savings institutions that customers must be allowed to withdraw their cash, and requiring those which don't, to address the violation.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>At the front of the firing line are Bradford &amp; Bingley, Liverpool Victoria, and Julian Hodge Bank, which attracted huge inflows of money because they have been consistently among the best buys. All three specifically prohibit withdrawals. The Ipswich Building Society joined them last week, becoming the latest to offer a fixed- rate Isa, outlawing withdrawals until the end of the term.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>A written statement from the Revenue said:"When ISAs were introduced Ministers made it clear that one of the their main objectives was to encourage non-savers to start saving, and people with small amounts saved, to save more. It was therefore important that ISAs would not lock in savers' money as this would exclude people with limited resources who might need access to their money quickly.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>"We do not consider that a product whose terms and conditions actually prevented withdrawals or transfers during a fixed term would be consistent with Ministers' intentions or the statutory rules."</paragraph>
            <paragraph>So serious are the Revenue's concerns that they no longer trust banks and building societies to monitor themselves. They plan to introduce a new requirement which insists institutions submit full details of all Isa accounts to them for approval, before they becomes available to the public. Until now, banks merely had to satisify themselves they were not breaking the rules.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Paul James, marketing manager of Julian Hodge Bank, said the fixed accounts were launched in response to customer demand.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>He said:"People were asking for a fixed rate, and those who have taken them out over the past couple of years have done well. We understood that Isas had to be transferable on notice, which we took to be the end of the fixed period.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>"We were audited by the Revenue last year, and the issue was not raised at that stage, so we thought everything was OK. If we have been successfully audited then the accounts can't be otherwise but OK surely?"</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Nigel Snell, a spokesman for Liverpool Victoria said that its range of five Isas prohibiting withdrawals did include a proviso in the small print allowing access to funds "in exceptional circumstances and by permission of the trustees".</paragraph>
            <paragraph>He added:"We make it clear to people that their money is locked away, but thought the account was compliant because of this clause in the small print."</paragraph>
            <paragraph>An Ipswich spokesman said it was aware there was some ambiguity when its account was launched last week. However, it acknowledged it may have to review its terms and conditions again, after seeing the letter from the Revenue.</paragraph>
        </text>
        <date>
            <day>10</day>
            <month>05</month>
            <year>2002</year>
        </date>
        <source>Sexymoney</source>
        <portal>Finance</portal>
        <ID number="2610981009.98103"/>
    </article>
</document>

evaluates the XPath 2.0 expression and copies to the output all nodes selected:

<text>
            <paragraph>Tax relief could be withdrawn from tens of thousands of Individual Savings Account, sheltering up to £500 million from tax, because some banks and building societies are flouting not only the spirit, but the letter of the laws governing them.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>This will come as alarming news to thousands of savers who invested in fixed rate Isas which they thought would offer them security combined with a tax shelter The Inland Revenue is writing to all Britain's savings institutions reminding them of the basic Isa rules and warning that tax relief will be withdrawn if these are manipulated in anyway.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Furthermore, the Revenue will castigate some deposit-takers for already breaching the rules and demand they speedily rewrite their terms and conditions, or face loss of tax-relief.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>The guardian of the nations coffers is known to be deeply disturbed at the rapid recent growth of fixed- rate Isas which lock savers in for several years, maintaining these are unlawful. It is sending a stark reminder to all savings institutions that customers must be allowed to withdraw their cash, and requiring those which don't, to address the violation.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>At the front of the firing line are Bradford &amp; Bingley, Liverpool Victoria, and Julian Hodge Bank, which attracted huge inflows of money because they have been consistently among the best buys. All three specifically prohibit withdrawals. The Ipswich Building Society joined them last week, becoming the latest to offer a fixed- rate Isa, outlawing withdrawals until the end of the term.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>A written statement from the Revenue said:"When ISAs were introduced Ministers made it clear that one of the their main objectives was to encourage non-savers to start saving, and people with small amounts saved, to save more. It was therefore important that ISAs would not lock in savers' money as this would exclude people with limited resources who might need access to their money quickly.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>"We do not consider that a product whose terms and conditions actually prevented withdrawals or transfers during a fixed term would be consistent with Ministers' intentions or the statutory rules."</paragraph>
            <paragraph>So serious are the Revenue's concerns that they no longer trust banks and building societies to monitor themselves. They plan to introduce a new requirement which insists institutions submit full details of all Isa accounts to them for approval, before they becomes available to the public. Until now, banks merely had to satisify themselves they were not breaking the rules.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Paul James, marketing manager of Julian Hodge Bank, said the fixed accounts were launched in response to customer demand.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>He said:"People were asking for a fixed rate, and those who have taken them out over the past couple of years have done well. We understood that Isas had to be transferable on notice, which we took to be the end of the fixed period.</paragraph>
            <paragraph>"We were audited by the Revenue last year, and the issue was not raised at that stage, so we thought everything was OK. If we have been successfully audited then the accounts can't be otherwise but OK surely?"</paragraph>
            <paragraph>Nigel Snell, a spokesman for Liverpool Victoria said that its range of five Isas prohibiting withdrawals did include a proviso in the small print allowing access to funds "in exceptional circumstances and by permission of the trustees".</paragraph>
            <paragraph>He added:"We make it clear to people that their money is locked away, but thought the account was compliant because of this clause in the small print."</paragraph>
            <paragraph>An Ipswich spokesman said it was aware there was some ambiguity when its account was launched last week. However, it acknowledged it may have to review its terms and conditions again, after seeing the letter from the Revenue.</paragraph>
        </text>
<date>
            <day>10</day>
            <month>05</month>
            <year>2002</year>
        </date>
<source>Sexymoney</source>

This XSLT 1.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
     <xsl:copy-of select=
     "/*/article/head/following-sibling::*[following-sibling::portal]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

evaluates the XPath 1.0 expression on the provided XML document (above) and copies to the output the selected nodes, producing exactly the same result (above).

share|improve this answer
add comment

If there is only one head and portal node on the first level, you can enumerate all nodes that are after a head and before a portal node, and then take their children:

//head/following::*[following::portal]/descendant-or-self::*

or if there are multiple articles:

//article/head/following-sibling::*[following-sibling::portal]/descendant-or-self::*
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your help –  user1800825 Nov 8 '12 at 20:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.