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I wrote a simple Android native function that get a filename and some more arguments and read the file by mmapping (mmap) it's memory.

Because it's mmap, I don't really need to call "read()" so I just memcpy() from the address returned from the mmap().

But, somewhere I'm getting a SIGSEGV probably because I'm trying to access a memory which I not permitted. But I don't understand why, I already asked all file's memory to be mapped!

I'm attaching my code and the error I got:

EDIT

I fixed the unterminating loop, but still getting SIGSEGV after 25001984 bytes have been read. The function works on those arguments: jn_bytes = 100,000,000 jbuffer_size = 8192 jshared=jpopulate=jadvice=0

void Java_com_def_benchmark_Benchmark_testMmapRead(JNIEnv* env, jobject javaThis,
        jstring jfile_name, unsigned int jn_bytes, unsigned int jbuffer_size, jboolean jshared, jboolean jpopulate, jint jadvice) {
    const char *file_name = env->GetStringUTFChars(jfile_name, 0);

    /* *** start count  *** */
    int fd = open(file_name, O_RDONLY);
    //get the size of the file
    size_t length = lseek(fd, 0L, SEEK_END);
    lseek(fd, 0L, SEEK_SET);
    length = length>jn_bytes?jn_bytes:length;

    // man 2 mmap: MAP_POPULATE is only supported for private mappings since Linux 2.6.23
    int flags =  0;
    if (jshared) flags |= MAP_SHARED; else flags |= MAP_PRIVATE;
    if(jpopulate) flags |= MAP_POPULATE;
    //int flags = MAP_PRIVATE;
    int *  addr = reinterpret_cast<int *>(mmap(NULL, length , PROT_READ, flags , fd, 0));
    if (addr == MAP_FAILED) {
        __android_log_write(ANDROID_LOG_ERROR, "NDK_FOO_TAG", strerror(errno));
        return;
    }
    int * initaddr = addr;
    if(jadvice > 0)
        madvise(addr,length,jadvice==1?(MADV_SEQUENTIAL|MADV_WILLNEED):(MADV_DONTNEED));
    close(fd);

    char buffer[jbuffer_size];
    void *ret_val = buffer;
    int read_length = length;
    while(ret_val == buffer || read_length<jbuffer_size) {
/*****GETTING SIGSEGV SOMWHERE HERE IN THE WHILE************/
        ret_val = memcpy(buffer, addr,jbuffer_size);
        addr+=jbuffer_size;
        read_length -= jbuffer_size;
    }
    munmap(initaddr,length);
    /* stop count */
    env->ReleaseStringUTFChars(jfile_name, file_name);
}

and the error log:

    15736^done
(gdb) 
15737 info signal SIGSEGV
&"info signal SIGSEGV\n"
~"Signal        Stop\tPrint\tPass to program\tDescription\n"
~"SIGSEGV       Yes\tYes\tYes\t\tSegmentation fault\n"
15737^done
(gdb) 
15738-stack-list-arguments 0 0 0
15738^done,stack-args=[frame={level="0",args=[]}]
(gdb) 
15739-stack-list-locals 0
15739^done,locals=[]
(gdb) 
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2  
How big is the file? Can the system create a VLA on the stack that is that big? Use malloc() instead of char buffer[jbuffer_size];, but don't forget to free that too. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 7 '12 at 14:52
    
I'm asking mmap for length of 100MB, I don't see why is the array allocation method (stack/heap) would resolve this, because the several first memcpy work well (while debugging) but after that (when I remove my breakpoint and let it run) I get the SIGSEGV. means that I reached some address which I shouldn't access? –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 15:06
    
There are definitely upper bounds on what I can allocate via a VLA on the machines I work on, and I don't think I'd risk trying VLAs in the 100 MiB range — at the very least, I'd ensure that it worked reliably. Dynamic memory allocation (via malloc() et al) is a different matter, though even there you have to worry about systems that don't report the error for overcommitted memory until you go to access what they said was available but isn't when the time comes. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 7 '12 at 15:23
    
Now I run it with a report on the read_length so I see that consistently the last time I get a log about the read_length is 74998016 which means that if I reduce it from 100000000 (which is the original length) I get 25001984 (~ 24 MB) which means that I have read ~ 24 MB till the SIGSEGV. Does it help? I'm running on Android 2.3. And about the VLA you mentioned, if ~100MB is too much - the mmap should have return some error for my request, isn't it? And if you talk about my buffer - which is of size=8196, why the memcpy succeeded in the first times? –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 15:55
    
The VLA is buffer, and that's unrelated to mmap(). I am not an Android developer; I can't answer for what does or does not work on any version of Android. If I were debugging this problem, I'd go about testing whether VLAs work in large sizes. For example, can I allocate a 1 MiB, 2 MiB, 4 MiB, ... 128 MiB VLA and then use it safely (memset() is fine to test that). If all those are fine, then my guess at your problem is wrong and you can ignore me. If any of those fail, then maybe I was on the right track with my questions. What you then do about it depends on what you find. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 7 '12 at 15:59
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a big problem here:

    addr+=jbuffer_size;

You're bumping addr by sizeof(int) * jbuffer_size bytes whereas you just want to increment it by jbuffer_size bytes.

My guess is sizeof(int) is 4 on your system, hence you crash at around 25% of the way through your loop, because you're incrementing addr by a factor of 4x too much on each iteration.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean that if I do addr+=1 it will increment it by sizeof(int)? –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 17:11
    
Yes, that's how C (and related languages) work. Either use a char * pointer instead of an an int * pointer, or take care of the address arithmetic explicitly. Two recommendations: (i) read at least one good book on C and (ii) learn to use a debugger (e.g. gdb) - both will pay huge dividends in the long run. –  Paul R Nov 7 '12 at 17:12
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This loop never terminates because ret_val always equals buffer

void *ret_val = buffer;
int read_length = length;
while(ret_val == buffer || read_length<jbuffer_size) {
    /*****GETTING SIGSEGV SOMWHERE HERE IN THE WHILE************/
    ret_val = memcpy(buffer, addr,jbuffer_size);
    addr+=jbuffer_size;
    read_length -= jbuffer_size;
}

memcpy always returns it's first argument, so ret_val never changes.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this is a problem, but not the main problem. see comments. –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 15:56
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The while loop is infinite:

while(ret_val == buffer || read_length<jbuffer_size) {
    ret_val = memcpy(buffer, addr,jbuffer_size);
    addr+=jbuffer_size;
    read_length -= jbuffer_size;
}

as memcpy() always returns the desintation buffer so ret_val == buffer will always be true (and is therefore useless as part of the terminating condition). This means that addr is being incremented by jbuffer_size bytes on every iteration of the loop and is passed to memcpy(), resuting in accessing invalid memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this is a problem, but not the main problem. see comments. –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 16:00
add comment

The condition in while(ret_val == buffer || read_length<jbuffer_size) is wrong. ret_val == buffer will always be true, and if read_length<jbuffer_size is true when the loop is reached, it will always remain true because read_length is only ever reduced (well, until it underflows INT_MIN).

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed this is a problem, but not the main problem. see comments. –  Bush Nov 7 '12 at 16:03
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