Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Trying to create unit tests for my methods and can't seem to get the configuration right. I go New Test -> Unit Test Wizard -> Pick my method -> fill in test method values but I always get Assert.Inconclusive failed. Verify the correctness of this test method.

Here is a sample method:

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        }

        public int Mult(int a, int b)
        {
            return a * b;
        }
    }
}

and the test method:

[TestMethod()]
        public void MultTest()
        {
            Program target = new Program(); // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
            int a = 4; // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
            int b = 5; // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
            int expected = 20; // TODO: Initialize to an appropriate value
            int actual;
            actual = target.Mult(a, b);
            Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
            Assert.Inconclusive("Verify the correctness of this test method.");
        }

Seems straight forward enough, but am I missing something trivial?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

sure you do :

Assert.Inconclusive("Verify the correctness of this test method.");

Your test says inconclusive therfore the result of the test is inconclusive.. You should use this syntax "Assert.Inconclusive" only to cover edge cases you are really aware of.

AFAIC, I never use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats what I thought as it executes correctly when that line is taken out. Thanks. – sd_dracula Nov 7 '12 at 13:51

The Assert.Inconclusive is mainly a marker to tell you that you need to right your own verification steps for the test method. In other words, for what you are doing it can be removed as you have added your own Assertion.

It could also be used, if there is some logic in your test that prevents the full running of your test. So, if, for example, you couldn't create the object you were trying to test for some reason.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.