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I'm having some issues thinking out a good structure to build my classes and objects. In the code below I make use of an interface to define my class methods, but I also want to pass a database connection to my constructor so the class had this connection to work with. Is it correct as I coded it below that the constructor is placed within my class and the methods in my interface?

interface IDataItem
{
    public function saveItem(Item $theItem);
}

class DataItem implements IDataItem{
    public function __construct(Database $database) 
    { 
        $this->database = $database;
    }

    public function saveItem(Item $item) 
    {       
        //save the item
    }
}


$db = new Database(); //from a database class
$dataItem = new DataItem($db);          
$dataItem->saveItem($anItem);   
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Why not simply make your database object a singleton? –  Lübnah Nov 7 '12 at 13:49
1  
@Lübnah By making database object implement an interface, you can create a database-agnostic application that just uses the interface methods to store data, not knowing which data object instance is actually created. –  GolezTrol Nov 7 '12 at 14:02
    
@Lübnah because Singletons suck? –  Gordon Nov 7 '12 at 14:15
2  
@Gordon Sigh… keep your arguments objective. I'm sure you have some valid points, but your opinionated & confrontational presentation unnecessarily obfuscates them. –  Lübnah Nov 7 '12 at 14:32
    
@Lübnah they are objective if you click the link –  Gordon Nov 7 '12 at 14:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't personally think you should put the constructor in the interface because you'd never create a new object without being aware of which implementation you're using.

There is a mistake in your code, the method in an interface cannot have an implementation, it needs to be just a declaration, like this

interface IDataItem
{
    public function saveItem($theItem);
}
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Yes I'm sorry, that was a typo indeed, fixed it in the original post. –  randomizer Nov 7 '12 at 14:11

While it is technically possible to add the ctor to the Interface, Interfaces should not define the ctor because that would be an implementation detail of an implementing class. An Interface should just define the public API other collaborators can call upon. That is, they should not enforce a particular implementation.

If you'd put a ctor asking for a database connection in the Interface, you'd limit the concrete classes to the dependencies in the ctor signature. If a concrete class implementing the Interface needs different (because it's saving to a Webservice) or additional (maybe a Logger) dependency you cannot make that work with your Interface.

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1  
Thanks, I had forgotten the explicit Item declaration in the Interface. The original post has been edited –  randomizer Nov 7 '12 at 14:14

Interfaces are just a contract to enforce that classes that may be unrelated will all implement the same methods.

Since you have to explicitly know the class when constructing it, it is useless to put the constructor in the interface. You will never call the constructor through the interface. Your current solution is correct.

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Make a variable to hold the db handle in your class.

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1  
This is not helpful. –  Jimbo Jan 3 at 15:19

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