Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

LMlib.h

#ifndef LMlib_H
#define LMlib_H
#endif

#define MAX_IP_LENGTH 15         
#define MAX_TABLE_ROWS 255

struct ForwardingTableRow
{
        char address[MAX_IP_LENGTH];
        int subnetMask;
        int interface;
};

typedef struct ForwardingTableRow ForwardingTableRow;

LMlib.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include "LMlib.h"

void ReadForwardingTable(FILE* f,ForwardingTableRow * table)
{
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<MAX_TABLE_ROWS;i++)
        {
                fscanf(f,"%s %d %d",&table.address[i],&table.subnetMask[i],&table.interface[i]);
        }


}

Complier command:

cc LMlib.c LMlib.h main.c -lm

Error:

LMlib.c: In function ‘ReadForwardingTable’:
LMlib.c:11:27: error: request for member ‘address’ in something not a structure or union
LMlib.c:11:45: error: request for member ‘subnetMask’ in something not a structure or union
LMlib.c:11:66: error: request for member ‘interface’ in something not a structure or union

What have I done wrong?

share|improve this question
    
why are you using .h file in compilation,you can do cc without it –  Omkant Nov 7 '12 at 14:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have three problems: The first is that you don't use the array indexing properly. It's the table variable that is the array, not the structure member:

fscanf(f, "%s %d %d",
    table[i].address,
    &table[i].subnetMask,
    &table[i].interface);

The second problem is unrelated to your question, but may lead to trouble in the future. It's the include guard you have. The #endif should be at the end of the file, otherwise you only protect the single #define and nothing else.

The third, and most serious, problem is that you have one character to little in the address field. The maximum length of an IP-address is 15, which is correct, but if you want to treat it as a string you need space for the string terminator as well. Declare it as

address[MAX_IP_LENGTH + 1];

and it should be okay.

share|improve this answer

It is all about operator precedence. . has a higher precedence than &, so basically it says:

  &(table.address)[i]

and table is not a struct, but a pointer to struct. Then, you are wrong in your indexing, you are indexing the struct's members, not the array.

Rewrite like this:

  table[i].address
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.