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I know how to group data using LINQ, and I know how to split it into separate items, but I have no idea how to only partially ungroup it.

I have a set of data which looks something like this:

var data = new Dictionary<Header, Detail>()
{
    { new Header(), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part1", "Part2" } } }
};

In order to process this correctly, I need every instance of a duplicate part to be a separate entry in the dictionary (although it doesn't matter if it remains a dictionary - IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<Header, Detail>> is perfectly acceptable). However, I don't want to split up the Parts list entirely - having different parts in the list is fine.

Specifically, I want the end data to look like this:

{
  { new Header(), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2" } } },
  { new Header(), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1" } } },
}

For a more complex example:

var data = new Dictionary<Header, Detail>()
{
    { new Header(1), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part1", "Part2" } } },

    { new Header(2), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2" } } },

    { new Header(3), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2", "Part2", "Part2", "Part3", "Part3"} } }
};

var desiredOutput = new List<KeyValuePair<Header, Detail>>()
{
    { new Header(1), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2" } } },
    { new Header(1), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1" } } },

    { new Header(2), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2" } } },

    { new Header(3), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2", "Part 3" } } },
    { new Header(3), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part2", "Part3" } } },
    { new Header(3), new Detail { Parts = new List<string> { "Part2" } } }
};

Any advice?

share|improve this question
    
So is your input just a list of strings, or a dictionary with (possibly several) key-value pairs in it? –  Rawling Nov 7 '12 at 14:40
1  
{"Part1", "Part2", "Part3"}, {"Part2", "Part3"}, {"Part2"}, Why no {"Part1"}, {"Part1", "Part2"}? What's the rule here? –  deerchao Nov 7 '12 at 14:42
    
@deerchao - I'm not sure what you're asking. In the second example's input, there's only one Part1, so there's only one Part1 that gets output. –  Bobson Nov 7 '12 at 14:44
1  
+1 for sample input and desired output. –  Thom Smith Nov 7 '12 at 15:00
1  
@ThomSmith Two sample inputs and two sample outputs even, a simple case and a complex case. Very, very helpful. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 15:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Linq will not much help you here, but here is an extension method, which will do the trick:

public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<Header, Detail>> UngroupParts(
    this IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<Header, Detail>> data)
{
    foreach (var kvp in data)
    {
        Header header = kvp.Key;
        List<string> parts = kvp.Value.Parts.ToList();
        do
        {
            List<string> distinctParts = parts.Distinct().ToList();
            Detail detail = new Detail() { Parts = distinctParts };
            yield return new KeyValuePair<Header, Detail>(header, detail);

            foreach (var part in distinctParts)
                parts.Remove(part);
        }
        while (parts.Any());
    }
}

Usage:

var desiredOutput = data.UngroupParts();
share|improve this answer
    
I'm probably not going to do it as an extension method, because it's a very localized need at the moment, but I like this implementation. –  Bobson Nov 7 '12 at 16:30
    
@Bobson thnaks! Just replace yield return with desiredOutput.Add and it will work as simple method. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 7 '12 at 16:34
    
@lazyberezovsky It doesn't need to mutate the collection, it makes sense as a stand alone static method, i.e. remove this and use it like any other static method. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 17:41
    
@Servy agree, also good solution –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 7 '12 at 17:45

No, there isn't really an existing LINQ function that does all of this.

Essentially, if you were to imagine grouping Parts by each string, and thinking of each group as a row, what you want is each "column". I did this with a helper function GetNthValues (which is designed to model the LINQ style of functions). Once you have that, it's pretty much just a matter of doing the grouping on each part, calling the function, and putting the results back into a dictionary.

public static Dictionary<Header, Detail> Ungroup(Dictionary<Header, Detail> input)
{
    var output = new Dictionary<Header, Detail>();

    foreach (var key in input.Keys)
    {
        var lookup = input[key].Parts.ToLookup(part => part);

        bool done = false;

        for (int i = 0; !done; i++)
        {
            var parts = lookup.GetNthValues(i).ToList();
            if (parts.Any())
            {
                output.Add(new Header(key.Value), new Detail { Parts = parts });
            }
            else
            {
                done = true;
            }
        }
    }

    return output;
}

public static IEnumerable<TElement> GetNthValues<TKey, TElement>(
    this ILookup<TKey, TElement> source, int n)
{
    foreach (var group in source)
    {
        if (group.Count() > n)
        {
            yield return group.ElementAt(n);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Didn't know of ToLookup, +1!! –  Gabber Nov 7 '12 at 16:40
    
@Gabber In this context it's pretty much just the same as doing a GroupBy. The primary difference is that it eagerly evaluates the results, and stores them into actual data structures rather than just iterators. That's important because it means that calling Count and ElementAt are O(1) rather than O(n), and it also means that there won't be any problems that arise from iterating the subsequences multiple times (which I do). If execution of the grouping operator was deferred then certain types of input sequences could be buggy. But, you can pretend that ToLookup was just a GroupBy. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 16:59
    
Minor fix: group.Count() >= n should be group.Count() > n, I think. I got an index error when I tried it as is. I'm also probably going to steal GetNthValue for general utility. –  Bobson Nov 7 '12 at 17:38
    
@Bobson Your fix is correct. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 17:40

Create a SortedSet from the elements in the Detail part. This, converted to a List, is your first group, the SortedSet in fact, contains only one instance for each element in Detail.

Remove it from the original Detail part (or a copy of it). Repeat until detail's size is zero.

EDIT:

Trying with something similar to a single Linq statement. Let me use lists for simplicity

var total = new List<List<string>>() { 
    new List<string>(), 
    new List<string>(), 
    new List<string>(), 
    new List<string>(), 
    new List<string>(), 
    new List<string>() 
};

//the statement

var q = k.Aggregate(total, (listOlists, singleStrin) => {
    listOlists.Where(l => !l.Contains(singleStrin)).First().Add(singleStrin);
    return listOlists;
});

Basically I create an accumulator function that adds an element to a list of strings only if the list doesn't contain the element yet. The list itself is contained in an accumulator list. You need to initalize the accumulator list, otherwise the Linq statement would get even uglier.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any way to do that as a single LINQ statement? Or would I need to foreach over the whole input set and construct a new variant of it? –  Bobson Nov 7 '12 at 14:54
    
After answering I understood you probably wanted a linq solution, I'm thinking of one –  Gabber Nov 7 '12 at 14:55
    
Soooooo short! It's not totally linq as I couldn't figure out how to get listOlists to be returned as the aggregator element after adding an element to one of its sublists. I still think this is a nice solution totally fighting with code readability :) –  Gabber Nov 7 '12 at 15:33
    
@Gabber Note that it's not a particularly efficient solution though, as it won't scale as well if the data set is large. Also note that in this case you happened to "know" the number of lists needed at the start. Your code is missing the logic for adding a list when one isn't there, which it realistically needs to have. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 16:25
    
You are right, I know this solution is not efficient. My constraint for this answer is Lambda expression which has priority on time complexity. An objection: you can obtain the number of lists at the beginning with a function using space & time complexity of O(n) where n is the sum of Parts'length. –  Gabber Nov 7 '12 at 16:35

This will break a list of strings into multiple lists of strings with no duplicates.

List<string> oldParts = new List<string> { "Part1", "Part2", "Part2", "Part2", "Part3", "Part3" };
List<List<string>> allLists = new List<List<string>>();

foreach (string currentPart in oldParts)
{
    foreach (List<string> currentList in allLists)
    {
         // if currentList doesn't have the part, then 
         //    add part to the currentList, and process next part
         if (!currentList.Contains(currentPart))
         {
             currentList.Add(currentPart);
             goto NextPart;
         }
    }
    // if we get here, the part is already contained on in the lists
    // so add a new list to allLists
    // and add the part to the new list
    allLists.Add(new List<string> { currentPart });

    NextPart: ;
}     
share|improve this answer
1  
Not exactly an efficient option. It's O(N^3). If the data set is large that could be a problem. Also, you have a goto... –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 15:16
    
@Servy I think most of the "linq" answers will end up having a similar Big O, and I'm not really sure why the objection to a goto statement –  Brandon Nov 7 '12 at 15:41
    
Well, I have posted a more LINQ-esque answer here, and it maps each part list in O(N). You are correct though in that the other 2 answers are comparable to yours. As for the goto, I just think there are better and more logical ways of structuring the program that make it easier to read through. –  Servy Nov 7 '12 at 15:52
    
@Servy Thanks for the clarification, makes sense –  Brandon Nov 7 '12 at 15:56

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