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I have a MySQL trigger to update hours into a stats table based on UPDATE query being ran.

The trigger is:

DELIMITER //

CREATE TRIGGER update_stats AFTER UPDATE ON user_hours 

FOR EACH ROW

BEGIN

  IF NEW.hours_committed = 'completed' THEN


    INSERT INTO hours_statistics (user_id, opportunity_id, completed_hours) VALUES

      (OLD.user_id, OLD.opportunity_id, -OLD.completed_hours),

      (NEW.user_id, NEW.opportunity_id, +NEW.completed_hours)

    ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE

      completed_hours = completed_hours + VALUES(completed_hours);


  END IF;

END//

Working Query:

UPDATE user_hours JOIN user_calendar USING (user_calendar_id, opportunity_id)
SET    user_hours.completed_hours = agreed_hours,
       user_hours.hours_committed = 'completed'
WHERE  user_hours.hours_committed = 'accepted' 
   AND user_hours.completed_hours IS NULL
   AND user_calendar.date_start = CURRENT_DATE();

I have another query similar to the above which updates the same table but with a little difference that checked completed_hours are not null. The query is as follows:

UPDATE user_hours JOIN user_calendar USING (user_calendar_id, opportunity_id)
SET    user_hours.hours_committed = 'completed'
WHERE  user_hours.hours_committed = 'accepted' 
   AND user_hours.completed_hours IS NOT NULL
   AND user_calendar.date_start = '2012-08-23'

The above triggers the update trigger, however in the statistics table the completed_hours show as 0 for this last update query.

Anyone with better knowledge of triggers able to help me out?

Thanks,

Mark

share|improve this question
    
Does "-OLD.completed_hours" really work? I would think you'd need to do "0 - OLD.completed_hours". –  Alain Collins Nov 7 '12 at 17:08
1  
For the first query it works yea. Do you think changing to what you said will fix the entire issue ? –  MarkH Nov 7 '12 at 17:17
    
Learn something new every day. –  Alain Collins Nov 7 '12 at 17:44
    
@AlainCollins Did not know this either. Definitely +1. –  Kermit Nov 7 '12 at 18:11

2 Answers 2

Solution was:

DELIMITER //

CREATE TRIGGER update_stats AFTER UPDATE ON user_hours 

FOR EACH ROW

BEGIN

IF  NEW.hours_committed =  'completed'  THEN
IF OLD.completed_hours IS NULL THEN
BEGIN
INSERT INTO hours_statistics (user_id,opportunity_id,completed_hours)
VALUES
(OLD.user_id, OLD.opportunity_id, -OLD.completed_hours),
(NEW.user_id, NEW.opportunity_id, +NEW.completed_hours)
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
completed_hours = completed_hours + VALUES(completed_hours);
END;
ELSE
INSERT INTO hours_statistics (user_id,opportunity_id,completed_hours)
VALUES
(NEW.user_id, NEW.opportunity_id, +NEW.completed_hours)
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE
completed_hours = completed_hours + VALUES(completed_hours);
END IF;
END  IF;


END//
share|improve this answer

In the INSERT, you're doing two row operations - one subtraction and one addition.

When you have a duplicate, the ON DUPLICATE KEY will run twice - once for the subtraction and once for the addition.

In your second query, there is no changed value for completed_hours, so OLD and NEW will be the same. You'll add the value, then subtract the value, yielding 0.

Maybe :)

If not, you've got a problem with NULL somewhere.

EDIT: I'm not sure I was clear. Here's an attempt to be more explicit:

You do your second update:

UPDATE user_hours JOIN user_calendar USING (user_calendar_id, opportunity_id)
SET    user_hours.hours_committed = 'completed' ...

Let's say this find one user_hours row to update, that looks like this:

user_id = 1
opportunity_id = 2
hours_committed = 'accepted' 
completed_hours = 10

and it then fires the trigger, which wants to run two INSERTS:

INSERT INTO hours_statistics (user_id, opportunity_id, completed_hours) VALUES (1,2,-10)

INSERT INTO hours_statistics (user_id, opportunity_id, completed_hours) VALUES (1,2,+10)

If the UNIQUE KEY is violated, it will then run the ON DUPLICATE KEY part, twice, effectively doing:

UPDATE hour_statistics set completed_hours = completed_hours + -10 WHERE...

UPDATE hour_statistics set completed_hours = completed_hours + 10 WHERE...

The point that I was trying to make is that those last two should offset each other. If the original hour_statistics.completed_hours was 0, it will be 0 after the trigger fires.

Make sense this time?

share|improve this answer
    
The completed_hours has a value for the fields being queried. Affected rows shows a count so it is doing something, it gets the user id, other id but the hours show 0 –  MarkH Nov 7 '12 at 18:54
    
Hi Alain, Thanks for explaining that further, so in your opinion. What would be the best solution to manage both types of update with an updated Trigger? also that didnt cover the completed hours and Query 2. Be very grateful if you could provide a working Trigger solution for this. Many thanks. –  MarkH Nov 7 '12 at 19:45
    
What if the trigger used two INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE statements, where one dealt with adding and the second dealt with subtracting? –  Alain Collins Nov 7 '12 at 19:58
    
hmm, ideally all we are looking to do is: if agreed_hours is NULL we insert or (update) the hours into stats table. If the agreed_hours is NOT NULL the assumption is the hours got adjusted so those should be used to insert or update the stats table. Obviously if a statement has ran once there will be data (as you've mentioned) checking duplicate key, also we dont want to loose that existing data, we just want to add + new hours to it. Same goes for the other way I've explained. Hope you can help me a bit more with this. –  MarkH Nov 7 '12 at 20:06
    
Should also say that hours_completed will either be empty (first query) or have a value greater than 0. –  MarkH Nov 7 '12 at 21:41

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