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When I compile my code I get 4 warnings - but how do I make them disappear? (and I don't mean with @SuppressWarnings)

PS: Obviously this must have been asked before - but either I cannot find it or I cannot apply it.


Output

warning: [unchecked] unchecked call to BaseWorker(C) as a member of the raw type BaseWorker
[warn] return new BaseWorker(this);

warning: [unchecked] unchecked conversion
[warn] found   : com.crashnote.BaseWorker
[warn] required: com.crashnote.BaseWorker<C>
[warn] return new BaseWorker(this);

warning: [unchecked] unchecked call to SubWorker(C) as a member of the raw type SubWorker
[warn] return new SubWorker(this);

warning: [unchecked] unchecked conversion
[warn] found   : com.crashnote.SubWorker
[warn] required: com.crashnote.SubWorker<C>
[warn] return new SubWorker(this);

Source Code

BaseConfig: instantiates BaseWorker

public class BaseConfig<C extends BaseConfig> {

    public BaseConfig(final Object c) {
    }

    public BaseWorker<C> getWorker() {
        return new BaseWorker(this);
    }
}

BaseWorker

public class BaseWorker<C extends BaseConfig> {

    public BaseWorker(final C config) {
    }
}

SubConfig: instantiates SubWorker

class SubConfig<C extends SubConfig> extends BaseConfig<C> {

    public SubConfig(final Object c) {
        super(c);
    }

    @Override
    public SubWorker<C> getWorker() {
        return new SubWorker(this);
    }
}

SubWorker: inherits from SubWorker

public class SubWorker<C extends BaseConfig> extends BaseWorker<C> {

      public SubWorker(final C config) {
          super(config);
      }  
}

Edit

I tried the provided solutions but for some reason it fails now.

A)

return new BaseWorker<BaseConfig>(this);

results in

incompatible types
[error] found   : BaseWorker<BaseConfig>
[error] required: BaseWorker<C>
[error] return new BaseWorker<BaseConfig>(this);

B)

return new BaseWorker<C>(this);

results in

cannot find symbol
[error] symbol  : constructor BaseWorker(BaseConfig<C>)
[error] location: class BaseWorker<C>
[error] return new BaseWorker<C>(this);

Hm, maybe I'm doing something wrong. This is Java 6 by the way, in case it matters.

share|improve this question
    
You need to supply generic parameter to the constructor: return new BaseWorker<BaseConfig>(this); –  Jakub Zaverka Nov 7 '12 at 15:08
1  
you miss the generics in all constructor calls –  guido Nov 7 '12 at 15:08
    
thanks! that's it :) –  stephanos Nov 7 '12 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

Instead of returning plain

return new BaseWorker(this);

Make it generic, because your BaseWorker class is defined as generic.

return new BaseWorker<C>(this);

Same rule applies for SubWorker also.

return new SubWorker<C>(this);

Update:

Based on exception message, your constructor also missing generics.

share|improve this answer
    
hm, this seems to result in an error (see edit) –  stephanos Nov 7 '12 at 15:39
    
Based on exception message, your constructor also missing generics. –  Nambari Nov 7 '12 at 15:42
    
if you add that to your answer I can accept it –  stephanos Nov 7 '12 at 15:48
    
Updated answer. Good luck with coding. –  Nambari Nov 7 '12 at 15:49

Try

 return new BaseWorker<C>(this);

and

 return new SubWorker<C>(this);
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, after applying the answers to my code I found out that they are actually wrong. Here is what seems to work.

BaseConfig now has a print() method (just to check we have the right type later) and adds a generic to the instantiation of BaseWorker.

public class BaseConfig<C extends BaseConfig> {

    public BaseConfig(final Object c) {
    }

    public BaseWorker<C> getWorker() {
        return new BaseWorker<C>(this);
    }

    public void print() {
        //
    }
}

Now this is where it gets interesting, BaseWorker has a constructor with a generic. This seems totally redundant - but it was the only way I found that worked. When you write just <C> it appears to be a new "local" generic additionally to the one of the class and a compiler error is raised (cannot find symbol: method print()).

public class BaseWorker<C extends BaseConfig> {

    public <C extends BaseConfig> BaseWorker(final C config) {
        config.print();
    }
}

SubConfig and SubWorker are changed accordingly.

PS: If this is utter nonsense please tell me :)

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