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I have the following lines of code where I used C++ Boost thread:

void threadFunc()
{
boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_Mutex);
//some code here...
condition.notify_one();
} 

So should I call unlock() function before the last line, like the following? What is the difference if I don't call unlock()?

void threadFunc()
{
boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(m_Mutex);
//some code here...
lock.unlock();
condition.notify_one();
} 
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

No -- the point of the scoped_lock class is that the lock is tied to the scope -- i.e., when the scoped_lock object goes out of scope, the lock is automatically released. This assures (for example) that if any of the intervening code throws an exception, the lock will still be released.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jerry for quick response. Then the question is: In Boost threading, the pair of mutex lock() and unlock() is pretty much useless because the scoped lock automatically releases the lock when going out of scope, right? – tonga Nov 7 '12 at 15:38
    
@tonga lock() and unlock() can be useful for cases where you can't use a scoped_lock (e.g. locking in one function and unlocking in another). – Angew Nov 7 '12 at 15:41
    
Thanks Angew for your comments. – tonga Nov 7 '12 at 15:55
    
@tonga: In fact, the mutex's lock() and unlock() are what scoped_lock uses to do it's job. For example, see the lock class in one of my previous answers. It's probably not quite identical to Boost's scoped_lock, but a pretty similar idea anyway. – Jerry Coffin Nov 7 '12 at 16:01

No. The lock is scoped, so it unlocks "automatically" as it goes out of scope. See RAII.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resource_Acquisition_Is_Initialization

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot Josh. – tonga Nov 7 '12 at 15:39

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