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For this code:

    var myObj = {
    callMeMaybe: function () {
        var myRef = this;
        var val = setTimeout(function () { 
            console.log('Time is running out!'); 
            myRef.callMeMaybe();
        }, 1000);
    }
};

myObj.callMeMaybe();
myObj = null;

if we call myObj.callMeMaybe() and then call myObj = null. We still can't cancel the call to callMeMaybe(); Anyway to solve this? Thanks.

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Have you tried clearTimeout? w3schools.com/jsref/met_win_cleartimeout.asp –  kleinkie Nov 7 '12 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

You need to window.clearTimeout on val.

    var myObj = {
    callMeMaybe: function () {
        var myRef = this;
        this.val = setTimeout(function () { // made val visible outside
            console.log('Time is running out!'); 
            myRef.callMeMaybe();
        }, 1000);
    }
};

myObj.callMeMaybe();

window.clearTimeout( myObj.val );
myObj = null;
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This causes the entire setTimeout to be cancelled, which is not what is being asked. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 7 '12 at 16:02

The clearTimeout() method clears a timer set with the setTimeout() method. The ID value returned by setTimeout() is used as the parameter for the clearTimeout() method.

clearTimeout(id_of_settimeout);

and the Number.MAX_VALUE is 1.7976931348623157e+308VALUE

I think this question can be done by clearTimeout loop 1.7976931348623157e+308VALUE times.

Does it take a long time?

Or you can get max id_of_settimeout by

max_id_of_settimeout = setTimeout(null,0);

Then loop back to zero

for (var i = max_id_of_settimeout;i>=0;i--){clearTimeout(i);}

Just my opinion.

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Why would you clear all the timers on the page? –  I Hate Lazy Nov 7 '12 at 16:07
    
because I think there's no way to cancel the set timer except clear all of them. –  whytobe Nov 7 '12 at 16:23

Overwrite the callMeMaybe property with a new function, or null if you don't mind the TypeError.

myObj.callMeMaybe();
myObj.callMeMaybe = function(){};

Now when the asynchronous call is made from the setTimeout, it will invoke the empty function.


If you don't want to overwrite the function, then just set a flag on the object.

var myObj = {
    callMeMaybe: function () {
        var myRef = this;
        var val = setTimeout(function () { 
            console.log('Time is running out!'); 
            if (!myRef.prevent)
                myRef.callMeMaybe();
        }, 1000);
    }
};

myObj.callMeMaybe();
myObj.prevent = true; // will prevent the .callMeMaybe() in the setTimeout

But to be clear, you can not clear the closure reference itself. Objects are reference types, and JavaScript is pass by value.

This means when you do this:

var myRef = this;

...you've made a copy of the object reference. Because myRef is a local variable, it can't be touched from the outside. Best you can do is manipulate the object that is referenced, or make the myRef variable available to the outer scope.

...and ignore the down-voters. They don't understand how JavaScript works.

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This won't work because setTimeout has already been called so the function passed to it has already been created. –  Paul S. Nov 7 '12 at 15:43
    
@PaulS.: That's not correct. The setTimeout callback is invoking the callMeMaybe from the object reference, which will have its callMeMaybe property overwritten. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 7 '12 at 15:44
    
Look at the question again, setTimeout is not using callMeMaybe until after the log has been done so code will still execute. –  Paul S. Nov 7 '12 at 15:48
    
@PaulS.: I know it's not. All you need to do is test the code to see that it works. The callMeMaybe is invoked from myObj, which means this === myObj. Then a reference is made in the function, so myRef === myObj. So when we overwrite the function on myObj, we're overwriting the function on myRef, and the code in the setTimeout will call the new function. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 7 '12 at 15:51
    
...There's no indication in the question that the console.log shouldn't be invoked. He's only asking how to cancel the callMeMaybe itself. –  I Hate Lazy Nov 7 '12 at 15:52

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