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Using C# (or VB.NET) which loop (for loop or do/while loop) should be used when a counter is required?

Does it make a difference if the loop should only iterate a set number of times or through a set range?

Scenario A - The for loop

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue; iLoop++)
{
  //Maybe do work here

  //Test criteria
  if (Criteria)
  {
    //Exit the loop
    break;
  }

  //Maybe do work here
}

Advantages

  • Counter is declared as part of loop
  • Easy to implement counter range

Disadvantages

  • Have to use an if to leave the loop

Scenario B - The do/while loop

int iLoop = 0;
do
{
  //Increment the counter
  iLoop++;

  //Do work here
} while (Criteria);

or

int iLoop = 0;
while (Criteria)
{
  //Increment the counter
  iLoop++; 

  //Do work here 
}

Advantages

  • Leaving the loop is part of the loop structure
  • Choice to evaluate before or after loop block

Disadvantages

  • Have to manage the counter manually
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2  
I wonder why everyone keeps copying the iLoop < int.MaxValue part in their answers when it's clearly always true... –  Blindy Aug 25 '09 at 10:30
    
title should be changed to add the "while" loop –  Luis Filipe Aug 25 '09 at 10:30
    
@Luis Filipe - While loop is in the title! –  Stevo3000 Aug 25 '09 at 10:37
    
@Stevo3000: I suggest "Which loop to use, for, While or do/while?" –  Luis Filipe Aug 25 '09 at 10:39
    
@Luis Filipe - The question refers to do/while meaning do or while. I don't think there is any real need to sperate them. –  Stevo3000 Aug 25 '09 at 11:20

13 Answers 13

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Just for completeness, you could also use option D:

for (int iLoop = 0; Criteria; iLoop++)
{
   // work here
}

(where Criteria is "to keep running")

the condition in a for loop doesn't have to involve iLoop. Unusual, though, but quite cute - only evaluates before work, though.

share|improve this answer
    
So a for loop can replicate the while loop without an if, but a for loop needs an if to replicate a do loop! –  Stevo3000 Aug 25 '09 at 10:31
    
and maybe even do not write iLoop++ because Criteria might not depend upon iLoop –  Luis Filipe Aug 25 '09 at 10:36
    
Well, it is suggested that the counter is needed, and it is nice to keep the increment away from the "meat" of the code. –  Marc Gravell Aug 25 '09 at 10:50
    
@Luis Filipe - @Marc is correct, the counter is part of the question. –  Stevo3000 Aug 25 '09 at 11:19

How about the best of both worlds:

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue && !Criteria; iLoop++)

Edit: Now that I think about it, I suppose comparing against int.MaxValue wasn't part of the criteria, but something to emulate an endless for loop, in that case you could just use:

for (int iLoop = 0; !Criterea; iLoop++)
share|improve this answer
    
Except he said there might be some work to do before checking Criteria –  Daphna Shezaf Aug 25 '09 at 10:21
    
@Daphna Shezaf: You're right, but you'd still need to have an if condition inside a while loop if you want to do some work before and after checking it –  Firas Assaad Aug 25 '09 at 10:23
    
@Firas - But no if if you only want to check a criteria after the loop body (do loop). I do like this construct tho. –  Stevo3000 Aug 25 '09 at 10:26
    
@Stevo3000: Yeah, it depends on what you want to do. I was referring to your for loop example where you had "may do work here" comments before and after the check for criteria. –  Firas Assaad Aug 25 '09 at 10:28
    
You could change the condition to: "(iLoop < int.MaxValue && !Criteria) || iLoop == 0)". That way, it will always do the code the first time through, since iLoop is created as 0. (If necessary, create iLoop as -1 and test for "iLoop == -1", depending how the counter is used in your code.) Or, I sometimes duplicate the "work to be done" code before the opening of the "for" loop. I know, sloppy :P –  samjetski Aug 25 '09 at 12:03
for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue && !Criteria; iLoop++) {
    //Do work here...
}
share|improve this answer

Instead of a dummy criteria in the for loop, you can use the actual criteria that you want to use for the loop:

Scenario A2 - the for loop with custom criteria:

for (int iLoop = 0; Criteria; iLoop++) {

  // do work here

}

This is equivalent to:

{
   int iLoop = 0;
   while (Criteria) {

      // do work here

      iLoop++;
   }
}

If you have a loop counter, you should generally use a for loop to make that clearer.

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I ususually use for, cause it's simple. I use while when counter is needed after or before loop or if using for is impossible.

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You can always add the exit criteria to for loop:

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue && Criteria; iLoop++)
{
  //Maybe do work here
}

I would really go for whatever looks most readable in your particular case.

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There's no reason not to use a for loop in this case. Even if you have other criteria, it's perfectly valid to write:

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue && Criteria; iLoop++) { ... }
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for loops consist of the following:

for ( initialization; condition; action )

you don’t need an extra if to check your criteria, what do you think is i < value? it’s nothing more than a criteria.

i use loops when they fit the problem, there’s no definite answer

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Write some test cases and see which works best for you. Have a look a this link: .Net/C# Loop Performance Test (FOR, FOREACH, LINQ, & Lambda)

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Personally I would go with the for loop.

It is better to read, more commonly used and very optimized.

for (int iLoop = 0; iLoop < int.MaxValue && !Criteria; iLoop++)
{
// Do Work
}

Edit: int.MaxValue && !Criteria <- a definietely better approach than my initial one ;)

share|improve this answer
    
++iLoop or iLoop++ makes no difference in C#, this will compile to the same IL. If you don't believe me, try it. –  Matt Howells Aug 25 '09 at 10:22
    
-1 for the wrong information about ++. It would never create a temporary variable in this case (and pretty much never in general either). –  Blindy Aug 25 '09 at 10:23
    
I disagree; pre-increment operators are relatively rare, and in C# offer no tangible performance improvement. You are adding uncertainty / confusion for no reason. –  Marc Gravell Aug 25 '09 at 10:23
    
Edited the anwer, thanks for letting me know - didn't know that it didn't matter in C# - at work I was told to use the ++ before the iterator... –  Faizan S. Aug 25 '09 at 10:26
    
integers aren't iterator objects. –  Blindy Aug 25 '09 at 10:28

I'd tend to use for if I'm actually using the counter in the loop, say as an index into an array, and as part of the criteria, i.e. "stop at the end of the array" rather than "just don't overflow".

If I'm looping over something with unknown length, such as lines in a file, or just maintaining the counter to use the total after the loop, then I'll use do or while.

However, it really comes down to what's more readable for a particular situation. I expect that you'd struggle to tell from the compiled IL which version was used.

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((((difference b/w while and do while--> let me tell you with one example : if a person going into a hall to fix a bomb inside the hall, he must be checked when getting in.. in another case if a person going into a hall to steal something from there he must have been checked when coming out of the hall.. so based on the process only we have to use our looping condition....))))

The for loop can execute a block of code for a fixed or given number of times.if your counter variable depends on that block of code(means inside the looping condition), you can use the for loop

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At least for me i use for() when i need to traverse an array and when no breaking is needed. And do() and while() when i need to process something for an unknown time.

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